Metals in Diabetes: Zinc Homeostasis in the Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes

Shudong Wang, Gilbert C. Liu, Kupper A. Wintergerst, Lu Cai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Zinc is an essential mineral that is required for various cellular functions. The associations of zinc with metabolic syndrome and diabetes stem from its requirement for insulin storage and secretion, its insulin-like action, and its antioxidant properties. Whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship of zinc with metabolic syndrome and diabetes remains unclear. Accumulating evidence has indicated that zinc deficiency is a common phenomenon in diabetic patients. Chronic low intake of zinc is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, and, conversely, diabetes also impairs zinc metabolism. Theoretically, zinc supplementation could reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, but supportive data are limited. This chapter summarizes available information, describing possible mechanisms by which zinc deficiency may lead to, and zinc treatment may prevent, metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMolecular Nutrition and Diabetes: A Volume in the Molecular Nutrition Series
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages169-182
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9780128015858
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Zinc
Homeostasis
Metals
Insulin
Minerals
Antioxidants

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Diabetes
  • Insulin resistance
  • Insulin-like function
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Metal homeostasis
  • Metallothionein
  • Zinc
  • Zinc transporters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wang, S., Liu, G. C., Wintergerst, K. A., & Cai, L. (2015). Metals in Diabetes: Zinc Homeostasis in the Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes. In Molecular Nutrition and Diabetes: A Volume in the Molecular Nutrition Series (pp. 169-182). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-801585-8.00014-2

Metals in Diabetes : Zinc Homeostasis in the Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes. / Wang, Shudong; Liu, Gilbert C.; Wintergerst, Kupper A.; Cai, Lu.

Molecular Nutrition and Diabetes: A Volume in the Molecular Nutrition Series. Elsevier Inc., 2015. p. 169-182.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wang, S, Liu, GC, Wintergerst, KA & Cai, L 2015, Metals in Diabetes: Zinc Homeostasis in the Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes. in Molecular Nutrition and Diabetes: A Volume in the Molecular Nutrition Series. Elsevier Inc., pp. 169-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-801585-8.00014-2
Wang S, Liu GC, Wintergerst KA, Cai L. Metals in Diabetes: Zinc Homeostasis in the Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes. In Molecular Nutrition and Diabetes: A Volume in the Molecular Nutrition Series. Elsevier Inc. 2015. p. 169-182 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-801585-8.00014-2
Wang, Shudong ; Liu, Gilbert C. ; Wintergerst, Kupper A. ; Cai, Lu. / Metals in Diabetes : Zinc Homeostasis in the Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes. Molecular Nutrition and Diabetes: A Volume in the Molecular Nutrition Series. Elsevier Inc., 2015. pp. 169-182
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