Metastatic breast cancer patients’ expectations and priorities for symptom improvement

Danielle B. Tometich, Catherine E. Mosher, Adam T. Hirsh, Kevin L. Rand, Shelley Johns, Marianne Matthias, Samantha D. Outcalt, Bryan Schneider, Lida Mina, Anna Maria Storniolo, Erin V. Newton, Kathy Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Little research has examined cancer patients’ expectations, goals, and priorities for symptom improvement. Thus, we examined these outcomes in metastatic breast cancer patients to provide patients’ perspectives on clinically meaningful symptom improvement and priorities for symptom management. Methods: Eighty women with metastatic breast cancer participated in a survey with measures of comorbidity, functional status, engagement in roles and activities, distress, quality of life, and the modified Patient-Centered Outcomes Questionnaire that focused on 10 common symptoms in cancer patients. Results: On average, patients reported low to moderate severity across the 10 symptoms and expected symptom treatment to be successful. Patients indicated that a 49% reduction in fatigue, 48% reduction in thinking problems, and 43% reduction in sleep problems would represent successful symptom treatment. Cluster analysis based on ratings of the importance of symptom improvement yielded three clusters of patients: (1) those who rated thinking problems, sleep problems, and fatigue as highly important, (2) those who rated pain as moderately important, and (3) those who rated all symptoms as highly important. The first patient cluster differed from other subgroups in severity of thinking problems and education. Conclusions: Metastatic breast cancer patients report differing symptom treatment priorities and criteria for treatment success across symptoms. Considering cancer patients’ perspectives on clinically meaningful symptom improvement and priorities for symptom management will ensure that treatment is consistent with their values and goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 7 2018

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Breast Neoplasms
Fatigue
Sleep
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Cluster Analysis
Comorbidity
Quality of Life
Education
Pain
Research
Thinking

Keywords

  • Expectation
  • Metastatic breast cancer
  • Patient-centered
  • Priorities
  • Symptom
  • Treatment outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Metastatic breast cancer patients’ expectations and priorities for symptom improvement. / Tometich, Danielle B.; Mosher, Catherine E.; Hirsh, Adam T.; Rand, Kevin L.; Johns, Shelley; Matthias, Marianne; Outcalt, Samantha D.; Schneider, Bryan; Mina, Lida; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Newton, Erin V.; Miller, Kathy.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, 07.05.2018, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tometich, Danielle B. ; Mosher, Catherine E. ; Hirsh, Adam T. ; Rand, Kevin L. ; Johns, Shelley ; Matthias, Marianne ; Outcalt, Samantha D. ; Schneider, Bryan ; Mina, Lida ; Storniolo, Anna Maria ; Newton, Erin V. ; Miller, Kathy. / Metastatic breast cancer patients’ expectations and priorities for symptom improvement. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2018 ; pp. 1-8.
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