Methamphetamine selectively alters brain glutathione

Christine Harold, Tanya Wallace, Ross Friedman, Gary Gudelsky, Bryan Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity has been proposed to involve oxidative stress, reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG, respectively), vitamin E and ascorbate were measured in the striata of rats killed 2 or 24 h after a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine. At 2 h, methamphetamine increased GSH and GSSG (32.5% and 43.7%, respectively) compared to controls at 2 h. No difference was seen in glutathione at 24 h, and in vitamin E and ascorbate at either time point. These findings indicate selectivity of methamphetamine for the glutathione system and a role for methamphetamine in inducing oxidative stress. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-102
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume400
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 14 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Glutathione
Glutathione Disulfide
Brain
Vitamin E
Oxidative Stress

Keywords

  • Glutathione
  • Methamphetamine
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Methamphetamine selectively alters brain glutathione. / Harold, Christine; Wallace, Tanya; Friedman, Ross; Gudelsky, Gary; Yamamoto, Bryan.

In: European Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 400, No. 1, 14.07.2000, p. 99-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harold, Christine ; Wallace, Tanya ; Friedman, Ross ; Gudelsky, Gary ; Yamamoto, Bryan. / Methamphetamine selectively alters brain glutathione. In: European Journal of Pharmacology. 2000 ; Vol. 400, No. 1. pp. 99-102.
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