Micron-scale voltage and [Ca2+]i imaging in the intact heart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Studies in isolated cardiomyocytes have provided tremendous information at the cellular and molecular level concerning regulation of transmembrane voltage (Vm) and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The ability to use the information gleaned to gain insight into the function of ion channels and Ca2+ handling proteins in a more complex system, e. g., the intact heart, has remained a challenge. We have developed laser scanning fluorescence microscopy-based approaches to monitor, at the sub-cellular to multi-cellular level in the immobilized, Langendorff-perfused mouse heart, dynamic changes in [Ca2+]i and Vm. This article will review the use of single- or dual-photon laser scanning microscopy [Ca2+]i imaging in conjunction with transgenic reporter technology to a) interrogate the extent to which transplanted, donor-derived myocytes or cardiac stem cell-derived de novo myocytes are capable of forming a functional syncytium with the pre-existing myocardium, using entrainment of [Ca2+]i transients by the electrical activity of the recipient heart as a surrogate for electrical coupling, and b) characterize the Ca2+ handling phenotypes of cellular implants. Further, we will review the ability of laser scanning fluorescence microscopy in conjunction with a fast-response voltage-sensitive to resolve, on a subcellular level in Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts, Vm dynamics that typically occur during the course of a cardiac action potential. Specifically, the utility of this technique to measure microscopic-scale voltage gradients in the normal and diseased heart is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number451
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume5
Issue numberNov
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Confocal Microscopy
Fluorescence Microscopy
Cardiac Myocytes
Giant Cells
Ion Channels
Photons
Muscle Cells
Action Potentials
Heart Diseases
Myocardium
Stem Cells
Calcium
Technology
Phenotype
Proteins
Isolated Heart Preparation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Micron-scale voltage and [Ca2+]i imaging in the intact heart. / Lu, Xiao Long; Rubart-von der Lohe, Michael.

In: Frontiers in Physiology, Vol. 5, No. Nov, 451, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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