Micronodular thymic neoplasms: Case series and literature review with emphasis on the spectrum of differentiation

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report nine cases of micronodular thymoma with lymphoid B-cell hyperplasia and one case of micronodular thymic carcinoma with lymphoid hyperplasia from our institution. For a better understanding of these rare tumors, clinical records, and histological features of these cases were reviewed, with detailed review of additional 64 literature cases of micronodular thymic neoplasms. The joint analysis identified 64 cases of micronodular thymoma with lymphoid B-cell hyperplasia and 9 cases of micronodular thymic carcinoma with lymphoid hyperplasia. Both groups revealed slight male predilection, with male:female ratio of 1.3:1 and 5:4, and occurred at >40 years of age, with a mean of 64 (41-83) and 62 (42-78) years, respectively. Myasthenia gravis was noted in 3/64 (5%) and 1/9 (11%) patients, respectively. Other systemic, disimmune, or hematologic disorders were noted in 6/64 (9%) and 1/9 (11%) patients, respectively. Components of conventional thymoma were reported in 11/64 (17%) micronodular thymomas with lymphoid B-cell hyperplasia, with transitional morphology between the two components in most of them. Cellular morphology was predominantly spindle in micronodular thymoma with lymphoid B-cell hyperplasia when specified (30/43), and epithelioid in micronodular thymic carcinoma with lymphoid hyperplasia (6/9), and cytological atypia was more encountered in the latter. Dedifferentiation/transformation from micronodular thymoma with lymphoid B-cell hyperplasia to micronodular thymic carcinoma with lymphoid hyperplasia seems to occur in a small subset of cases. Three cases of micronodular thymomas with lymphoid B-cell hyperplasia were described with co-existent low-grade B-cell lymphomas. Follow-up data were available for 30 micronodular thymomas with lymphoid B-cell hyperplasia and 6 micronodular thymic carcinomas with lymphoid hyperplasia, with a mean of 47 (0.2-180) months and 23 (3-39) months, respectively. Patients were alive without disease, except for five micronodular thymoma with lymphoid B-cell hyperplasia patients (dead from unrelated causes), and one micronodular thymic carcinoma with lymphoid hyperplasia patient (dead of disease).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1415-1427
Number of pages13
JournalModern Pathology
Volume28
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this