Microtensile bond strength of glass ionomer cements to artificially created carious dentin

Kyungho Choi, Yoshiki Oshida, Jeffrey A. Platt, Michael A. Cochran, Bruce A. Matis, Keewook Yi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this laboratory study, the microtensile bond strengths of a conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin modified glass ionomer cement (CRMGIC) to artificially created carious dentin and sound dentin were compared, and the ultrastructural morphology of the fractured interface was examined with a low-vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM). The specimens were divided into 4 groups: 1) a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil Plus Aplicap) placed on sound dentin; 2) a conventional GIC placed on artificially created carious dentin; 3) an RMGIC (Photac-Fil Aplicap) placed on sound dentin and 4) an RMGIC placed on artificially created carious dentin. Artificial carious lesions were created using a chemical demineralizing solution of 0.1 M/L lactic acid and 0.2% carbopol. GIC buildups were made on the dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's directions. After storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned vertically into 1 × 1 × 8-mm beams for the microtensile bond strength test. The microtensile bond strength of each specimen was measured, and failure mode was determined using an optical microscope (40×). The fractured surfaces were further examined with SEM. Two-way analysis of variance showed that the mean microtensile bond strengths of a GIC and an RMGIC to carious dentin were significantly lower than those to sound dentin, and the mean microtensile bond strengths of Photac-Fil to both sound and carious dentin were significantly higher than those of Ketac-Fil Plus. Chi-square tests indicated that there was a significant difference in failure mode between the sound dentin and carious dentin groups. In sound dentin groups, cohesive failure in GIC was predominant; whereas, mixed failure was predominant in carious dentin groups. SEM examination showed that the specimens determined to be cohesive failures under light microscopy in the Photac-Fil/Sound Dentin group were actually mixed failures under high magnification of SEM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)590-597
Number of pages8
JournalOperative dentistry
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

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Glass Ionomer Cements
Dental Caries
Dentin
Electrons
Chi-Square Distribution
Vacuum
Microscopy
Lactic Acid
Analysis of Variance
Tooth
Light
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Microtensile bond strength of glass ionomer cements to artificially created carious dentin. / Choi, Kyungho; Oshida, Yoshiki; Platt, Jeffrey A.; Cochran, Michael A.; Matis, Bruce A.; Yi, Keewook.

In: Operative dentistry, Vol. 31, No. 5, 01.09.2006, p. 590-597.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choi, Kyungho ; Oshida, Yoshiki ; Platt, Jeffrey A. ; Cochran, Michael A. ; Matis, Bruce A. ; Yi, Keewook. / Microtensile bond strength of glass ionomer cements to artificially created carious dentin. In: Operative dentistry. 2006 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 590-597.
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