Microvascular pressures in rat intestinal muscle and mucosal villi

R. W. Gore, H. Bohlen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Direct pressures were recorded from single innervated microvessels in intestinal muscle, submucosal surface, and mucosal villi of rats. Results were compared with existing data from whole-organ, isogravimetric studies. Pressures were recorded with a servonull transducer; vessel dimensions, with a video device; relative blood flows in muscle and mucosal regions, with microparticles. When femoral artery pressure was 100-110 mmHg, average (±SE) pressures in first-, second-, third-, and fifth-order muscle and submucosal arterioles were 44.8 ± 1.6, 44.6 ± 2.9, 32.4 ± 2.6, and 26.6 ± 2.0 mmHg, respectively. Pressures in fourth-, second-, and first-order muscle and submucosal venules were 16.2 ± 0.8, 14.6 ± 0.9, and 10.5 ± 0.6 mmHg, respectively; muscle capillary pressures averaged 23.8 ± 1.5 mmHg. Average (±SE) pressures in distributing arterioles, capillaries and second-order venules in mucosal villi were 30.6 ± 1.8, 13.8 ± 2.2, and 12.8 ± 1.5 mmHg, respectively. Relative mean (±SE) blood flows were 30 ± 1% in the muscles and 70 ± 1% in mucosal villi. Results show significant regional differences in capillary pressures exist between intestinal muscle and mucosal layers. Capillary pressures and relative flows were used to calculate a weighted-average capillary pressure of 16.8 mmHg for the whole intestine, which compares favorably with results from isogravimetric studies and implies that regions in the intestine may continuously filter or absorb while the whole organ is in fluid balance. Results resolve an apparent discrepancy between previous isogravimetric and microcirculatory experiments, but raise new questions about regional differences in transcapillary fluid exchange. Also, resistance ratios calculated from the data indicate venular resistances in the intestine are more important than previously thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume2
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1977
Externally publishedYes

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Pressure
Muscles
Intestines
Venules
Arterioles
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Femoral Artery
Microvessels
Transducers
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

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title = "Microvascular pressures in rat intestinal muscle and mucosal villi",
abstract = "Direct pressures were recorded from single innervated microvessels in intestinal muscle, submucosal surface, and mucosal villi of rats. Results were compared with existing data from whole-organ, isogravimetric studies. Pressures were recorded with a servonull transducer; vessel dimensions, with a video device; relative blood flows in muscle and mucosal regions, with microparticles. When femoral artery pressure was 100-110 mmHg, average (±SE) pressures in first-, second-, third-, and fifth-order muscle and submucosal arterioles were 44.8 ± 1.6, 44.6 ± 2.9, 32.4 ± 2.6, and 26.6 ± 2.0 mmHg, respectively. Pressures in fourth-, second-, and first-order muscle and submucosal venules were 16.2 ± 0.8, 14.6 ± 0.9, and 10.5 ± 0.6 mmHg, respectively; muscle capillary pressures averaged 23.8 ± 1.5 mmHg. Average (±SE) pressures in distributing arterioles, capillaries and second-order venules in mucosal villi were 30.6 ± 1.8, 13.8 ± 2.2, and 12.8 ± 1.5 mmHg, respectively. Relative mean (±SE) blood flows were 30 ± 1{\%} in the muscles and 70 ± 1{\%} in mucosal villi. Results show significant regional differences in capillary pressures exist between intestinal muscle and mucosal layers. Capillary pressures and relative flows were used to calculate a weighted-average capillary pressure of 16.8 mmHg for the whole intestine, which compares favorably with results from isogravimetric studies and implies that regions in the intestine may continuously filter or absorb while the whole organ is in fluid balance. Results resolve an apparent discrepancy between previous isogravimetric and microcirculatory experiments, but raise new questions about regional differences in transcapillary fluid exchange. Also, resistance ratios calculated from the data indicate venular resistances in the intestine are more important than previously thought.",
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T1 - Microvascular pressures in rat intestinal muscle and mucosal villi

AU - Gore, R. W.

AU - Bohlen, H.

PY - 1977

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N2 - Direct pressures were recorded from single innervated microvessels in intestinal muscle, submucosal surface, and mucosal villi of rats. Results were compared with existing data from whole-organ, isogravimetric studies. Pressures were recorded with a servonull transducer; vessel dimensions, with a video device; relative blood flows in muscle and mucosal regions, with microparticles. When femoral artery pressure was 100-110 mmHg, average (±SE) pressures in first-, second-, third-, and fifth-order muscle and submucosal arterioles were 44.8 ± 1.6, 44.6 ± 2.9, 32.4 ± 2.6, and 26.6 ± 2.0 mmHg, respectively. Pressures in fourth-, second-, and first-order muscle and submucosal venules were 16.2 ± 0.8, 14.6 ± 0.9, and 10.5 ± 0.6 mmHg, respectively; muscle capillary pressures averaged 23.8 ± 1.5 mmHg. Average (±SE) pressures in distributing arterioles, capillaries and second-order venules in mucosal villi were 30.6 ± 1.8, 13.8 ± 2.2, and 12.8 ± 1.5 mmHg, respectively. Relative mean (±SE) blood flows were 30 ± 1% in the muscles and 70 ± 1% in mucosal villi. Results show significant regional differences in capillary pressures exist between intestinal muscle and mucosal layers. Capillary pressures and relative flows were used to calculate a weighted-average capillary pressure of 16.8 mmHg for the whole intestine, which compares favorably with results from isogravimetric studies and implies that regions in the intestine may continuously filter or absorb while the whole organ is in fluid balance. Results resolve an apparent discrepancy between previous isogravimetric and microcirculatory experiments, but raise new questions about regional differences in transcapillary fluid exchange. Also, resistance ratios calculated from the data indicate venular resistances in the intestine are more important than previously thought.

AB - Direct pressures were recorded from single innervated microvessels in intestinal muscle, submucosal surface, and mucosal villi of rats. Results were compared with existing data from whole-organ, isogravimetric studies. Pressures were recorded with a servonull transducer; vessel dimensions, with a video device; relative blood flows in muscle and mucosal regions, with microparticles. When femoral artery pressure was 100-110 mmHg, average (±SE) pressures in first-, second-, third-, and fifth-order muscle and submucosal arterioles were 44.8 ± 1.6, 44.6 ± 2.9, 32.4 ± 2.6, and 26.6 ± 2.0 mmHg, respectively. Pressures in fourth-, second-, and first-order muscle and submucosal venules were 16.2 ± 0.8, 14.6 ± 0.9, and 10.5 ± 0.6 mmHg, respectively; muscle capillary pressures averaged 23.8 ± 1.5 mmHg. Average (±SE) pressures in distributing arterioles, capillaries and second-order venules in mucosal villi were 30.6 ± 1.8, 13.8 ± 2.2, and 12.8 ± 1.5 mmHg, respectively. Relative mean (±SE) blood flows were 30 ± 1% in the muscles and 70 ± 1% in mucosal villi. Results show significant regional differences in capillary pressures exist between intestinal muscle and mucosal layers. Capillary pressures and relative flows were used to calculate a weighted-average capillary pressure of 16.8 mmHg for the whole intestine, which compares favorably with results from isogravimetric studies and implies that regions in the intestine may continuously filter or absorb while the whole organ is in fluid balance. Results resolve an apparent discrepancy between previous isogravimetric and microcirculatory experiments, but raise new questions about regional differences in transcapillary fluid exchange. Also, resistance ratios calculated from the data indicate venular resistances in the intestine are more important than previously thought.

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