Milk consumption in relation to incidence of prostate, breast, colon, and rectal cancers

Is there an independent effect?

Jianjun Zhang , Hugo Kesteloot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Milk contains a wide variety of ingredients, such as nutrients, hormones, and chemical contaminants. Whether milk consumption is associated with the risk of prostate, breast, colon, and rectal cancers is unclear and was evaluated in this study. Data on milk consumption for 9 time periods (1964-1994) and incidence rates of prostate, female breast, colon, and rectal cancers, mostly around 1993-1997, in 38 countries were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization, respectively. Milk consumption was strongly correlated with incidence rates of prostate cancer (T = 0.65-0.69; all P <0.0001) and breast cancer (r = 0.64-0.74; all P <0.0001) in all the nine time periods examined. A modest positive correlation was found for colon and rectal cancers in both sexes (all P <0.05, except for rectal cancer in the first three time periods). The previous findings remained essentially unchanged after adjustment for vegetable, alcohol, and cigarette consumption but disappeared after further adjustment for non-milk fat consumption, except for breast cancer in the last three time periods. The present study does not support an overall substantial effect of milk consumption on the risk of prostate, breast, colon, and rectal cancers at the population level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-72
Number of pages8
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

milk consumption
prostatic neoplasms
Rectal Neoplasms
colorectal neoplasms
breast neoplasms
Colonic Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Milk
Breast Neoplasms
incidence
Incidence
Food
Agriculture
Tobacco Products
Alcohol Drinking
Vegetables
Prostate
Fats
Organizations
Hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology
  • Food Science

Cite this

Milk consumption in relation to incidence of prostate, breast, colon, and rectal cancers : Is there an independent effect? / Zhang , Jianjun; Kesteloot, Hugo.

In: Nutrition and Cancer, Vol. 53, No. 1, 2005, p. 65-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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