Missing the target for routine human papillomavirus vaccination: Consistent and strong physician recommendations are lacking for 11- to 12-year-old males

Susan T. Vadaparampil, Teri L. Malo, Steven K. Sutton, Karla N. Ali, Jessica A. Kahn, Alix Casler, Daniel Salmon, Barbara Walkosz, Richard G. Roetzheim, Gregory Zimet, Anna R. Giuliano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Rates of routine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of adolescent males in the United States are low. Leading health organizations advocate consistent and strong physician recommendations to improve HPV vaccine dissemination. This study describes the prevalence and correlates of consistent and strong physician recommendations for HPV vaccination of adolescent males. Methods: We surveyed pediatric and family medicine physicians in Florida about their HPV vaccine recommendations for male vaccine-eligible age groups (11-12, 13-17, 18-21 years). Descriptive statistics compared consistency and strength of HPV recommendations across age groups. Multivariable logistic regression examined factors associated with consistent and strong recommendations for 11- to 12-year-olds. Results: We received 367 completed surveys (51% response rate). Physicians most often consistently and strongly recommended HPV vaccine to males ages 13 to 17 (39%) compared with ages 11 to 12 (31%) and 18 to 21 (31%). Consistent and strong recommendation for 11- to 12-year-old males was more likely to be delivered by Vaccine for Children providers and less likely among physicians who reported more personal barriers to vaccination, particularly concerns about vaccine safety, concerns about adding vaccines to the vaccine schedule, and difficulty in remembering to discuss HPV vaccination. Conclusions: Physicians' current consistency and strength of HPV vaccine recommendations do not align with national recommendations. Interventions to improve HPV vaccine recommendations must also consider the influence of physicians' personal barriers to HPV vaccine delivery. Impact: As one of the first studies to examine both consistency and strength of physicians' HPV vaccine recommendations for males, our findings can inform future interventions focused on facilitating physicians' recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1435-1446
Number of pages12
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Papillomavirus Vaccines
Vaccination
Physicians
Vaccines
Age Groups
Family Physicians
Appointments and Schedules
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Medicine
Pediatrics
Safety
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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Missing the target for routine human papillomavirus vaccination : Consistent and strong physician recommendations are lacking for 11- to 12-year-old males. / Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Malo, Teri L.; Sutton, Steven K.; Ali, Karla N.; Kahn, Jessica A.; Casler, Alix; Salmon, Daniel; Walkosz, Barbara; Roetzheim, Richard G.; Zimet, Gregory; Giuliano, Anna R.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 25, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1435-1446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vadaparampil, Susan T. ; Malo, Teri L. ; Sutton, Steven K. ; Ali, Karla N. ; Kahn, Jessica A. ; Casler, Alix ; Salmon, Daniel ; Walkosz, Barbara ; Roetzheim, Richard G. ; Zimet, Gregory ; Giuliano, Anna R. / Missing the target for routine human papillomavirus vaccination : Consistent and strong physician recommendations are lacking for 11- to 12-year-old males. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 10. pp. 1435-1446.
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AU - Sutton, Steven K.

AU - Ali, Karla N.

AU - Kahn, Jessica A.

AU - Casler, Alix

AU - Salmon, Daniel

AU - Walkosz, Barbara

AU - Roetzheim, Richard G.

AU - Zimet, Gregory

AU - Giuliano, Anna R.

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