Modelling breast cancer: One size does not fit all

Tracy Vargo-Gogola, Jeffrey M. Rosen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

399 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breast cancer is not a single disease, but is instead a collection of diseases that have distinct histopathological features, genetic and genomic variability, and diverse prognostic outcomes. Thus, no individual model would be expected to completely recapitulate this complex disease. Here, the models commonly used to investigate breast cancer including cell lines, xenografts and genetically engineered mice, are discussed to help address the question: what is the most powerful way to investigate this heterogeneous disease?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)659-672
Number of pages14
JournalNature Reviews Cancer
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Breast Neoplasms
Heterografts
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Modelling breast cancer : One size does not fit all. / Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

In: Nature Reviews Cancer, Vol. 7, No. 9, 09.2007, p. 659-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vargo-Gogola, Tracy ; Rosen, Jeffrey M. / Modelling breast cancer : One size does not fit all. In: Nature Reviews Cancer. 2007 ; Vol. 7, No. 9. pp. 659-672.
@article{68fb0669dceb4ff398bff930a9e0f498,
title = "Modelling breast cancer: One size does not fit all",
abstract = "Breast cancer is not a single disease, but is instead a collection of diseases that have distinct histopathological features, genetic and genomic variability, and diverse prognostic outcomes. Thus, no individual model would be expected to completely recapitulate this complex disease. Here, the models commonly used to investigate breast cancer including cell lines, xenografts and genetically engineered mice, are discussed to help address the question: what is the most powerful way to investigate this heterogeneous disease?",
author = "Tracy Vargo-Gogola and Rosen, {Jeffrey M.}",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1038/nrc2193",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "659--672",
journal = "Nature Reviews Cancer",
issn = "1474-175X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Modelling breast cancer

T2 - One size does not fit all

AU - Vargo-Gogola, Tracy

AU - Rosen, Jeffrey M.

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - Breast cancer is not a single disease, but is instead a collection of diseases that have distinct histopathological features, genetic and genomic variability, and diverse prognostic outcomes. Thus, no individual model would be expected to completely recapitulate this complex disease. Here, the models commonly used to investigate breast cancer including cell lines, xenografts and genetically engineered mice, are discussed to help address the question: what is the most powerful way to investigate this heterogeneous disease?

AB - Breast cancer is not a single disease, but is instead a collection of diseases that have distinct histopathological features, genetic and genomic variability, and diverse prognostic outcomes. Thus, no individual model would be expected to completely recapitulate this complex disease. Here, the models commonly used to investigate breast cancer including cell lines, xenografts and genetically engineered mice, are discussed to help address the question: what is the most powerful way to investigate this heterogeneous disease?

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548268026&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548268026&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nrc2193

DO - 10.1038/nrc2193

M3 - Article

C2 - 17721431

AN - SCOPUS:34548268026

VL - 7

SP - 659

EP - 672

JO - Nature Reviews Cancer

JF - Nature Reviews Cancer

SN - 1474-175X

IS - 9

ER -