Moderate to severe Alzheimer disease: Definition and clinical relevance

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the special issues of patients with moderate to severe AD represents one of the most important challenges in the care of these patients. The most important problem facing patients with moderate to severe AD is the rapid loss of autonomy and the increase in neuropsychiatric symptoms. The creation of a unified definition of moderate to severe AD is necessary, particularly for communication among health care providers and to establish continuity in disease staging for research studies. Most importantly, a clearer understanding of the features of the moderate to severe stages of AD among health care providers is essential, because interventions are available that can delay the declines associated with these later stages of disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S1-S4
JournalNeurology
Volume65
Issue number6 SUPPL. 3
StatePublished - Sep 27 2005

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Health Personnel
Alzheimer Disease
Patient Care
Communication
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Moderate to severe Alzheimer disease : Definition and clinical relevance. / Farlow, Martin R.

In: Neurology, Vol. 65, No. 6 SUPPL. 3, 27.09.2005, p. S1-S4.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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