Molecular genetics of bipolar disorder

E. P. Hayden, John Nurnberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bipolar disorder (BPD) is an often devastating illness characterized by extreme mood dysregulation. Although family, twin and adoption studies consistently indicate a strong genetic component, specific genes that contribute to the illness remain unclear. This study gives an overview of linkage studies of BPD, concluding that the regions with the best evidence for linkage include areas on chromosomes 2p, 4p, 4q, 6q, 8q, 11p, 12q, 13q, 16p, 16q, 18p, 18q, 21q, 22q and Xq. Association studies are summarized, which support a possible role for numerous candidate genes in BPD including COMT, DAT, HTR4, DRD4, DRD2, HTR2A, 5-HTT, the G72/G30 complex, DISC1, P2RX7, MAOA and BDNF. Animal models related to bipolar illness are also reviewed, with special attention paid to those with clear genetic implications. We conclude with suggestions for strategies that may help clarify the genetic bases of this complex illness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-95
Number of pages11
JournalGenes, Brain and Behavior
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

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Inborn Genetic Diseases
Bipolar Disorder
Molecular Biology
Gene Components
Twin Studies
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Animal Models
Chromosomes
Genes

Keywords

  • Association studies
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Linkage analysis
  • Molecular genetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Genetics

Cite this

Molecular genetics of bipolar disorder. / Hayden, E. P.; Nurnberger, John.

In: Genes, Brain and Behavior, Vol. 5, No. 1, 02.2006, p. 85-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hayden, E. P. ; Nurnberger, John. / Molecular genetics of bipolar disorder. In: Genes, Brain and Behavior. 2006 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 85-95.
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