Molecular mechanisms mediating protective effect of cAMP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) hyperpermeability

Natalia Bogatcheva, Marina A. Zemskova, Yevgeniy Kovalenkov, Christophe Poirier, Alexander D. Verin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Up to date, the nature of the sepsis-induced vascular leakage is understood only partially, which limits pharmacological approaches for its management. Here we studied the protective effect of cAMP using endotoxin-induced hyperpermeability as a model for barrier dysfunction observed in gram-negative sepsis. We demonstrated that the alleviation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced barrier compromise could be achieved by the specific activation of either protein kinase A (PKA) or Epac with cAMP analogs Bnz-cAMP or O-Me-cAMP, respectively. We next studied the involvement of PKA substrates VASP and filamin1 in barrier maintenance and LPS-induced barrier compromise. Depletion of both VASP and filamin1 with the specific siRNAs significantly exacerbated both the quiescent cells barrier and LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, suggesting barrier-protective role of these proteins. VASP depletion was associated with the more severe loss of ZO-1 peripheral staining in response to LPS, whereas filamin1-depleted cells reacted to LPS with more robust stress fiber induction and more profound changes in ZO-1 and VE-cadherin peripheral organization. Both VASP and filamin1 phosphorylation was significantly increased as a result of PKA activation.Wenext analyzed the effect of VASP and filamin1 depletion on the PKA-dependent alleviation of LPS-induced barrier compromise. We observed that Bnz-cAMP ability to counteract LPS-induced hyperpermeability was attenuated only by VASP, but not filamin1 depletion. Our data indicate that while PKA-dependent VASP phosphorylation contributes to the protective effect of cAMP elicited on LPS-compromised monolayers, filamin1 phosphorylation is unlikely to play a significant role in this process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)750-759
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
Volume221
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Endothelial cells
Lipopolysaccharides
Endothelial Cells
Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases
Lung
Phosphorylation
Sepsis
Chemical activation
Stress Fibers
Endotoxins
Blood Vessels
Monolayers
Maintenance
Pharmacology
Staining and Labeling
Fibers
Substrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Molecular mechanisms mediating protective effect of cAMP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) hyperpermeability. / Bogatcheva, Natalia; Zemskova, Marina A.; Kovalenkov, Yevgeniy; Poirier, Christophe; Verin, Alexander D.

In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, Vol. 221, No. 3, 12.2009, p. 750-759.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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