Molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption in estrogen dependent processes

Robert Bigsby, Minerva Mercado-Feliciano, Josephine Mubiru

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Estrogens are normally produced in cyclic fashion in adult females and induce transient effects in reproductive organs, brain, and pituitary, allowing for cyclic reproductive activity. In addition, the natural pattern of estrogen secretion at puberty is responsible for changes in the body known as secondary sexual characteristics, such as hairless facial skin, breast development, and body fat distribution. Estrogens also program developmental processes resulting in permanent morphological changes such as sexually dimorphic areas of the brain or short stature in women due to closure of the epiphyseal plates of long bones. Thus, estrogens or environmental mimics of estrogen can produce permanent, heritable changes in cells and tissues, either as a natural course of gender differences or as pathological manifestations of inappropriate exposure from exogenous sources. It is because of the irreversible nature of developmental effects that special attention must be paid to the actions of environmental estrogens during embryonic and fetal stages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEndocrine Disruptors
Subtitle of host publicationEffects on Male and Female Reproductive Systems, Second Edition
PublisherCRC Press
Pages217-247
Number of pages31
ISBN (Electronic)9781420038866
ISBN (Print)0849322812, 9780849322815
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Estrogens
Body Fat Distribution
Growth Plate
Brain
Puberty
Breast
Bone and Bones
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bigsby, R., Mercado-Feliciano, M., & Mubiru, J. (2004). Molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption in estrogen dependent processes. In Endocrine Disruptors: Effects on Male and Female Reproductive Systems, Second Edition (pp. 217-247). CRC Press.

Molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption in estrogen dependent processes. / Bigsby, Robert; Mercado-Feliciano, Minerva; Mubiru, Josephine.

Endocrine Disruptors: Effects on Male and Female Reproductive Systems, Second Edition. CRC Press, 2004. p. 217-247.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Bigsby, R, Mercado-Feliciano, M & Mubiru, J 2004, Molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption in estrogen dependent processes. in Endocrine Disruptors: Effects on Male and Female Reproductive Systems, Second Edition. CRC Press, pp. 217-247.
Bigsby R, Mercado-Feliciano M, Mubiru J. Molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption in estrogen dependent processes. In Endocrine Disruptors: Effects on Male and Female Reproductive Systems, Second Edition. CRC Press. 2004. p. 217-247
Bigsby, Robert ; Mercado-Feliciano, Minerva ; Mubiru, Josephine. / Molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption in estrogen dependent processes. Endocrine Disruptors: Effects on Male and Female Reproductive Systems, Second Edition. CRC Press, 2004. pp. 217-247
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