Morphine analgesia and acute physical dependence: rapid onset of two opposing, dose-related processes

Dong H. Kim, Howard L. Fields, Nicholas Barbaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enhanced responsiveness to noxious stimulation is a reliable sign of opioid withdrawal and is therefore a measure of physical dependence. In lightly anesthetized rats, naloxone, given i.v. 15 min following i.v. morphine, caused a significant shortening of tail flick latency (hyperalgesia). At each dose of naloxone (0.1, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg), the magnitude of the observed hyperalgesia was a function of the preceding dose of morphine (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg). Thus morphine rapidly induces two dose-related opposing processes: one results in antinociception and the other in the potential for hyperalgesia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-40
Number of pages4
JournalBrain Research
Volume516
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 14 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hyperalgesia
Analgesia
Morphine
Naloxone
Opioid Analgesics
Tail

Keywords

  • Analgesia
  • Dependency
  • Morphine
  • Opioid withdrawal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Morphine analgesia and acute physical dependence : rapid onset of two opposing, dose-related processes. / Kim, Dong H.; Fields, Howard L.; Barbaro, Nicholas.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 516, No. 1, 14.05.1990, p. 37-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Dong H. ; Fields, Howard L. ; Barbaro, Nicholas. / Morphine analgesia and acute physical dependence : rapid onset of two opposing, dose-related processes. In: Brain Research. 1990 ; Vol. 516, No. 1. pp. 37-40.
@article{4ade400250fb42298ec6cb9d2c56cd7b,
title = "Morphine analgesia and acute physical dependence: rapid onset of two opposing, dose-related processes",
abstract = "Enhanced responsiveness to noxious stimulation is a reliable sign of opioid withdrawal and is therefore a measure of physical dependence. In lightly anesthetized rats, naloxone, given i.v. 15 min following i.v. morphine, caused a significant shortening of tail flick latency (hyperalgesia). At each dose of naloxone (0.1, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg), the magnitude of the observed hyperalgesia was a function of the preceding dose of morphine (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg). Thus morphine rapidly induces two dose-related opposing processes: one results in antinociception and the other in the potential for hyperalgesia.",
keywords = "Analgesia, Dependency, Morphine, Opioid withdrawal",
author = "Kim, {Dong H.} and Fields, {Howard L.} and Nicholas Barbaro",
year = "1990",
month = "5",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1016/0006-8993(90)90894-H",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "516",
pages = "37--40",
journal = "Brain Research",
issn = "0006-8993",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Morphine analgesia and acute physical dependence

T2 - rapid onset of two opposing, dose-related processes

AU - Kim, Dong H.

AU - Fields, Howard L.

AU - Barbaro, Nicholas

PY - 1990/5/14

Y1 - 1990/5/14

N2 - Enhanced responsiveness to noxious stimulation is a reliable sign of opioid withdrawal and is therefore a measure of physical dependence. In lightly anesthetized rats, naloxone, given i.v. 15 min following i.v. morphine, caused a significant shortening of tail flick latency (hyperalgesia). At each dose of naloxone (0.1, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg), the magnitude of the observed hyperalgesia was a function of the preceding dose of morphine (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg). Thus morphine rapidly induces two dose-related opposing processes: one results in antinociception and the other in the potential for hyperalgesia.

AB - Enhanced responsiveness to noxious stimulation is a reliable sign of opioid withdrawal and is therefore a measure of physical dependence. In lightly anesthetized rats, naloxone, given i.v. 15 min following i.v. morphine, caused a significant shortening of tail flick latency (hyperalgesia). At each dose of naloxone (0.1, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg), the magnitude of the observed hyperalgesia was a function of the preceding dose of morphine (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg). Thus morphine rapidly induces two dose-related opposing processes: one results in antinociception and the other in the potential for hyperalgesia.

KW - Analgesia

KW - Dependency

KW - Morphine

KW - Opioid withdrawal

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025333160&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025333160&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0006-8993(90)90894-H

DO - 10.1016/0006-8993(90)90894-H

M3 - Article

C2 - 2163724

AN - SCOPUS:0025333160

VL - 516

SP - 37

EP - 40

JO - Brain Research

JF - Brain Research

SN - 0006-8993

IS - 1

ER -