Mothers' beliefs about the causes of infant growth deficiency

Is there attributional bias?

Lynne A. Sturm, Dennis Drotar, Kathleen Laing, Gregory Zimet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tested for defensive attributional bias in mothers' causal explanations for infant (2-12.5 months) growth deficiency. Mothers of healthy babies (controls; n = 82), growth deficient babies without medical problems (n = 27) and growth-deficient babies with mild medical problems (n = 22) rated their levels of agreement with 23 causes of growth problems which were designed to vary in the degree of personal threat to parenting self-esteem. Ratings were completed for the mother's (Own) baby and for a nonspecific (Other) baby. Findings partially support a theory of defensive attributional bias, with higher agreement when causes referred to Other (vs. Own) baby, and lower agreement with family-related than with medical/nutritional causes. Factors that may have influenced material experience of threat and implications of the findings for clinical practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-344
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1997

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Mothers
Growth
Parenting
Self Concept

Keywords

  • Growth
  • Health beliefs
  • Infants
  • Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Mothers' beliefs about the causes of infant growth deficiency : Is there attributional bias? / Sturm, Lynne A.; Drotar, Dennis; Laing, Kathleen; Zimet, Gregory.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 22, No. 3, 06.1997, p. 329-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sturm, Lynne A. ; Drotar, Dennis ; Laing, Kathleen ; Zimet, Gregory. / Mothers' beliefs about the causes of infant growth deficiency : Is there attributional bias?. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 1997 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 329-344.
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