Motivating compliance: Juvenile probation officer strategies and skills

Katherine Schwartz, Andrew O. Alexander, Katherine S L Lau, Evan D. Holloway, Matthew Aalsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Juvenile probation officers aim to improve youth compliance with probation conditions, but questions remain about how officers motivate youth. The study’s purpose was to determine which officer-reported probation strategies (client-centered vs. confrontational) were associated with their use of evidence-based motivational interviewing skills. Officers (N = 221) from 18 Indiana counties demonstrated motivational interviewing skills by responding to scenarios depicting issues common to youth probationers. Results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that, while officer endorsement of client-centered strategies was not associated with differential use of motivational interviewing skills, officers endorsing confrontational strategies were less likely to demonstrate motivational interviewing skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-37
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Offender Rehabilitation
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

Fingerprint

Motivational Interviewing
probation officer
Compliance
probationer
probation
regression analysis
scenario
Regression Analysis
evidence

Keywords

  • Juvenile offenders
  • motivational interviewing
  • principles of effective intervention
  • probation practice
  • probationers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Law

Cite this

Motivating compliance : Juvenile probation officer strategies and skills. / Schwartz, Katherine; Alexander, Andrew O.; Lau, Katherine S L; Holloway, Evan D.; Aalsma, Matthew.

In: Journal of Offender Rehabilitation, Vol. 56, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 20-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwartz, Katherine ; Alexander, Andrew O. ; Lau, Katherine S L ; Holloway, Evan D. ; Aalsma, Matthew. / Motivating compliance : Juvenile probation officer strategies and skills. In: Journal of Offender Rehabilitation. 2017 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 20-37.
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