Multicenter, randomized trial of quantitative pretest probability to reduce unnecessary medical radiation exposure in emergency department patients with chest pain and dyspnea

Jeffrey Kline, Alan E. Jones, Nathan I. Shapiro, Jackeline Hernandez, Melanie M. Hogg, Jennifer Troyer, R. Darrel Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background-Use of pretest probability can reduce unnecessary testing. We hypothesize that quantitative pretest probability, linked to evidence-based management strategies, can reduce unnecessary radiation exposure and cost in low-risk patients with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism. Methods and Results-This was a prospective, 4-center, randomized controlled trial of decision support effectiveness. Subjects were adults with chest pain and dyspnea, nondiagnostic ECGs, and no obvious diagnosis. The clinician provided data needed to compute pretest probabilities from a Web-based system. Clinicians randomized to the intervention group received the pretest probability estimates for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism and suggested clinical actions designed to lower radiation exposure and cost. The control group received nothing. Patients were followed for 90 days. The primary outcome and sample size of 550 was predicated on a significant reduction in the proportion of healthy patients exposed to >5 mSv chest radiation. A total of 550 patients were randomized, and 541 had complete data. The proportion with >5 mSv to the chest and no significant cardiopulmonary diagnosis within 90 days was reduced from 33% to 25% (P=0.038). The intervention group had significantly lower median chest radiation exposure (0.06 versus 0.34 mSv; P=0.037, Mann-Whitney U test) and lower median costs ($934 versus $1275; P=0.018) for medical care. Adverse events occurred in 16% of controls and 11% in the intervention group (P=0.06). Conclusions-Provision of pretest probability and prescriptive advice reduced radiation exposure and cost of care in lowrisk ambulatory patients with symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-73
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation: Cardiovascular Imaging
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Chest Pain
Dyspnea
Multicenter Studies
Hospital Emergency Service
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Pulmonary Embolism
Costs and Cost Analysis
Thorax
Nonparametric Statistics
Sample Size
Electrocardiography
Randomized Controlled Trials
Radiation Exposure
Radiation
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Decision making
  • Diagnosis
  • Malpractice
  • Pulmonary embolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Multicenter, randomized trial of quantitative pretest probability to reduce unnecessary medical radiation exposure in emergency department patients with chest pain and dyspnea. / Kline, Jeffrey; Jones, Alan E.; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Hernandez, Jackeline; Hogg, Melanie M.; Troyer, Jennifer; Nelson, R. Darrel.

In: Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2014, p. 66-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kline, Jeffrey ; Jones, Alan E. ; Shapiro, Nathan I. ; Hernandez, Jackeline ; Hogg, Melanie M. ; Troyer, Jennifer ; Nelson, R. Darrel. / Multicenter, randomized trial of quantitative pretest probability to reduce unnecessary medical radiation exposure in emergency department patients with chest pain and dyspnea. In: Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging. 2014 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 66-73.
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