National study of internal medicine manpower XVIII

Subspecialty fellowships with a special look at hematology and oncology, 1988-1989

Christopher S. Lyttle, Ronald M. Andersen, Kristen Neymarc, C. Schmidt, Claire H. Kohrman, Gerald S. Levey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the number and distribution of internists in subspecialty training and compare with data collected since 1976; to determine the distribution of activity of subspecialty fellows; and to focus on hematology and oncology. Design: Repeated mail survey with telephone follow-up. Participants: All directors of subspecialty training programs in internal medicine in the United States. Results: The 1988-1989 census identified 7530 fellows in training, 55 more than in 1987-1988. There are 24 more first-year fellows. Reports on the activities of subspecialty fellows show that, overall, 53% of fellows' time is spent in direct patient care, 20% on basic research, 15% on patient-related research, and 12% in teaching. Conclusions: The number of internists entering subspecialty training has risen at a considerably slower rate in the last 5 years compared with the 5 years before that. The length of subspecialty training has increased significantly since 1976. There has been a shift in subspecialty choice from hematology to oncology and toward joint programs offering both subspecialties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-42
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume114
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Hematology
Internal Medicine
Postal Service
Censuses
Research
Telephone
Patient Care
Teaching
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

National study of internal medicine manpower XVIII : Subspecialty fellowships with a special look at hematology and oncology, 1988-1989. / Lyttle, Christopher S.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Neymarc, Kristen; Schmidt, C.; Kohrman, Claire H.; Levey, Gerald S.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 114, No. 1, 01.01.1991, p. 36-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyttle, Christopher S. ; Andersen, Ronald M. ; Neymarc, Kristen ; Schmidt, C. ; Kohrman, Claire H. ; Levey, Gerald S. / National study of internal medicine manpower XVIII : Subspecialty fellowships with a special look at hematology and oncology, 1988-1989. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 114, No. 1. pp. 36-42.
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