Neural control of ventricular rate in ambulatory dogs with pacing-induced sustained atrial fibrillation

Hyung Wook Park, Mark J. Shen, Seongwook Han, Tetsuji Shinohara, Mitsunori Maruyama, Young Soo Lee, Changyu Shen, Chun Hwang, Lan S. Chen, Michael C. Fishbein, Shien Fong Lin, Peng Sheng Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background-We hypothesize that inferior vena cava-inferior atrial ganglionated plexus nerve activity (IVC-IAGPNA) is responsible for ventricular rate (VR) control during atrial fibrillation (AF) in ambulatory dogs. Methods and Results-We recorded bilateral cervical vagal nerve activity (VNA) and IVC-IAGPNA during baseline sinus rhythm and during pacing-induced sustained AF in 6 ambulatory dogs. Integrated nerve activities and average VR were measured every 10 seconds over 24 hours. Left VNA was associated with VR reduction during AF in 5 dogs (from 211 bpm [95% CI, 186-233] to 178 bpm [95% CI, 145-210]; P<0.001) and right VNA in 1 dog (from 208 bpm [95% CI, 197-223] to 181 bpm [95% CI, 163-200]; P<0.01). There were good correlations between IVC-IAGPNA and left VNA in the former 5 dogs and between IVC-IAGPNA and right VNA in the last dog. IVC-IAGPNA was associated with VR reduction in all dogs studied. Right VNA was associated with baseline sinus rate reduction from 105 bpm (95% CI, 95-116) to 77 bpm (95% CI, 64-91; P<0.01) in 4 dogs, whereas left VNA was associated with sinus rate reduction from 111 bpm (95% CI, 90-1250) to 81 bpm (95% CI, 67-103; P<0.01) in 2 dogs. Conclusions-IVC-IAGPNA is invariably associated with VR reduction during AF. In comparison, right or left VNA was associated with VR reduction only when it coactivates with the IVC-IAGPNA. The vagal nerve that controls VR during AF may be different from that which controls sinus rhythm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)571-580
Number of pages10
JournalCirculation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Atrioventricular node
  • Autonomic nervous system
  • ECG
  • Ventricular rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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    Park, H. W., Shen, M. J., Han, S., Shinohara, T., Maruyama, M., Lee, Y. S., Shen, C., Hwang, C., Chen, L. S., Fishbein, M. C., Lin, S. F., & Chen, P. S. (2012). Neural control of ventricular rate in ambulatory dogs with pacing-induced sustained atrial fibrillation. Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 5(3), 571-580. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCEP.111.967737