Neuropsychologic impact of standard-dose systemic chemotherapy in long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma

Tim A. Ahles, Andrew Saykin, Charlotte T. Furstenberg, Bernard Cole, Leila A. Mott, Karen Skalla, Marie B. Whedon, Sarah Bivens, Tara Mitchell, E. Robert Greenberg, Peter M. Silberfarb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

529 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to compare the neuropsychologic functioning of long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who had been treated with standard-dose systemic chemotherapy or local therapy only. Patients and Methods: Long-term survivors (5 years postdiagnosis, not presently receiving cancer treatment, and disease-free) of breast cancer or lymphoma who had been treated with systemic chemotherapy (breast cancer: n = 35, age, 59.1 ± 10.7 years; lymphoma: n = 36, age, 55.9 ± 12.1 years) or local therapy only (breast cancer: n = 35, age, 60.6 ± 10.5 years; lymphoma: n = 22, age, 48.7 ± 11.7 years) completed a battery of neuropsychologic and psychologic tests (Center for Epidemiological Study-Depression, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Fatigue Symptom Inventory). Results: Multivariate analysis of variance, controlling for age and education, revealed that survivors who had been treated with systemic chemotherapy scored significantly lower on the battery of neuropsychologic tests compared with those treated with local therapy only (P <.04), particularly in the domains of verbal memory (P <.01) and psychomotor functioning (P <.03). Survivors treated with systemic chemotherapy were also more likely to score in the lower quartile on the Neuropsychological Performance Index (39% v 14%, P <.01) and to self-report greater problems with working memory on the Squire Memory Self-Rating Questionnaire (P <.02). Conclusion: Data from this study support the hypothesis that systemic chemotherapy can have a negative impact on cognitive functioning as measured by standardized neuropsychologic tests and self-report of memory changes. However, analysis of the Neuropsychological Performance Index suggests that only a subgroup of survivors may experience long-term cognitive deficits associated with systemic chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-493
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Survivors
Lymphoma
Breast Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Neuropsychological Tests
Self Report
Psychological Tests
Equipment and Supplies
Therapeutics
Short-Term Memory
Fatigue
Epidemiologic Studies
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis
Anxiety
Depression
Education
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Neuropsychologic impact of standard-dose systemic chemotherapy in long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma. / Ahles, Tim A.; Saykin, Andrew; Furstenberg, Charlotte T.; Cole, Bernard; Mott, Leila A.; Skalla, Karen; Whedon, Marie B.; Bivens, Sarah; Mitchell, Tara; Greenberg, E. Robert; Silberfarb, Peter M.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 20, No. 2, 15.01.2002, p. 485-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahles, TA, Saykin, A, Furstenberg, CT, Cole, B, Mott, LA, Skalla, K, Whedon, MB, Bivens, S, Mitchell, T, Greenberg, ER & Silberfarb, PM 2002, 'Neuropsychologic impact of standard-dose systemic chemotherapy in long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 485-493. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.20.2.485
Ahles, Tim A. ; Saykin, Andrew ; Furstenberg, Charlotte T. ; Cole, Bernard ; Mott, Leila A. ; Skalla, Karen ; Whedon, Marie B. ; Bivens, Sarah ; Mitchell, Tara ; Greenberg, E. Robert ; Silberfarb, Peter M. / Neuropsychologic impact of standard-dose systemic chemotherapy in long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2002 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 485-493.
@article{92c265aef8ed404d999fbd75c4584903,
title = "Neuropsychologic impact of standard-dose systemic chemotherapy in long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma",
abstract = "Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to compare the neuropsychologic functioning of long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who had been treated with standard-dose systemic chemotherapy or local therapy only. Patients and Methods: Long-term survivors (5 years postdiagnosis, not presently receiving cancer treatment, and disease-free) of breast cancer or lymphoma who had been treated with systemic chemotherapy (breast cancer: n = 35, age, 59.1 ± 10.7 years; lymphoma: n = 36, age, 55.9 ± 12.1 years) or local therapy only (breast cancer: n = 35, age, 60.6 ± 10.5 years; lymphoma: n = 22, age, 48.7 ± 11.7 years) completed a battery of neuropsychologic and psychologic tests (Center for Epidemiological Study-Depression, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Fatigue Symptom Inventory). Results: Multivariate analysis of variance, controlling for age and education, revealed that survivors who had been treated with systemic chemotherapy scored significantly lower on the battery of neuropsychologic tests compared with those treated with local therapy only (P <.04), particularly in the domains of verbal memory (P <.01) and psychomotor functioning (P <.03). Survivors treated with systemic chemotherapy were also more likely to score in the lower quartile on the Neuropsychological Performance Index (39{\%} v 14{\%}, P <.01) and to self-report greater problems with working memory on the Squire Memory Self-Rating Questionnaire (P <.02). Conclusion: Data from this study support the hypothesis that systemic chemotherapy can have a negative impact on cognitive functioning as measured by standardized neuropsychologic tests and self-report of memory changes. However, analysis of the Neuropsychological Performance Index suggests that only a subgroup of survivors may experience long-term cognitive deficits associated with systemic chemotherapy.",
author = "Ahles, {Tim A.} and Andrew Saykin and Furstenberg, {Charlotte T.} and Bernard Cole and Mott, {Leila A.} and Karen Skalla and Whedon, {Marie B.} and Sarah Bivens and Tara Mitchell and Greenberg, {E. Robert} and Silberfarb, {Peter M.}",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1200/JCO.20.2.485",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "485--493",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Oncology",
issn = "0732-183X",
publisher = "American Society of Clinical Oncology",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuropsychologic impact of standard-dose systemic chemotherapy in long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma

AU - Ahles, Tim A.

AU - Saykin, Andrew

AU - Furstenberg, Charlotte T.

AU - Cole, Bernard

AU - Mott, Leila A.

AU - Skalla, Karen

AU - Whedon, Marie B.

AU - Bivens, Sarah

AU - Mitchell, Tara

AU - Greenberg, E. Robert

AU - Silberfarb, Peter M.

PY - 2002/1/15

Y1 - 2002/1/15

N2 - Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to compare the neuropsychologic functioning of long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who had been treated with standard-dose systemic chemotherapy or local therapy only. Patients and Methods: Long-term survivors (5 years postdiagnosis, not presently receiving cancer treatment, and disease-free) of breast cancer or lymphoma who had been treated with systemic chemotherapy (breast cancer: n = 35, age, 59.1 ± 10.7 years; lymphoma: n = 36, age, 55.9 ± 12.1 years) or local therapy only (breast cancer: n = 35, age, 60.6 ± 10.5 years; lymphoma: n = 22, age, 48.7 ± 11.7 years) completed a battery of neuropsychologic and psychologic tests (Center for Epidemiological Study-Depression, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Fatigue Symptom Inventory). Results: Multivariate analysis of variance, controlling for age and education, revealed that survivors who had been treated with systemic chemotherapy scored significantly lower on the battery of neuropsychologic tests compared with those treated with local therapy only (P <.04), particularly in the domains of verbal memory (P <.01) and psychomotor functioning (P <.03). Survivors treated with systemic chemotherapy were also more likely to score in the lower quartile on the Neuropsychological Performance Index (39% v 14%, P <.01) and to self-report greater problems with working memory on the Squire Memory Self-Rating Questionnaire (P <.02). Conclusion: Data from this study support the hypothesis that systemic chemotherapy can have a negative impact on cognitive functioning as measured by standardized neuropsychologic tests and self-report of memory changes. However, analysis of the Neuropsychological Performance Index suggests that only a subgroup of survivors may experience long-term cognitive deficits associated with systemic chemotherapy.

AB - Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to compare the neuropsychologic functioning of long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who had been treated with standard-dose systemic chemotherapy or local therapy only. Patients and Methods: Long-term survivors (5 years postdiagnosis, not presently receiving cancer treatment, and disease-free) of breast cancer or lymphoma who had been treated with systemic chemotherapy (breast cancer: n = 35, age, 59.1 ± 10.7 years; lymphoma: n = 36, age, 55.9 ± 12.1 years) or local therapy only (breast cancer: n = 35, age, 60.6 ± 10.5 years; lymphoma: n = 22, age, 48.7 ± 11.7 years) completed a battery of neuropsychologic and psychologic tests (Center for Epidemiological Study-Depression, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Fatigue Symptom Inventory). Results: Multivariate analysis of variance, controlling for age and education, revealed that survivors who had been treated with systemic chemotherapy scored significantly lower on the battery of neuropsychologic tests compared with those treated with local therapy only (P <.04), particularly in the domains of verbal memory (P <.01) and psychomotor functioning (P <.03). Survivors treated with systemic chemotherapy were also more likely to score in the lower quartile on the Neuropsychological Performance Index (39% v 14%, P <.01) and to self-report greater problems with working memory on the Squire Memory Self-Rating Questionnaire (P <.02). Conclusion: Data from this study support the hypothesis that systemic chemotherapy can have a negative impact on cognitive functioning as measured by standardized neuropsychologic tests and self-report of memory changes. However, analysis of the Neuropsychological Performance Index suggests that only a subgroup of survivors may experience long-term cognitive deficits associated with systemic chemotherapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037080459&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037080459&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1200/JCO.20.2.485

DO - 10.1200/JCO.20.2.485

M3 - Article

C2 - 11786578

AN - SCOPUS:0037080459

VL - 20

SP - 485

EP - 493

JO - Journal of Clinical Oncology

JF - Journal of Clinical Oncology

SN - 0732-183X

IS - 2

ER -