Nurses' Work-Related Stress in China: A Comparison Between Psychiatric and General Hospitals

Yun Ke Qi, Yu Tao Xiang, Feng Rong An, Jing Wang, Jiao Ying Zeng, Gabor S. Ungvari, Robin Newhouse, Doris S F Yu, Kelly Y C Lai, Yan Ming Ding, Liuyang Yu, Xiang Yang Zhang, Helen F K Chiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Little is known about the level of work-related stress in nurses in China. This study compared the level of work-related stress between female nurses working in psychiatric and general hospitals in China. Design and Methods: A descriptive comparative cross-sectional design was used. A consecutive sample of nurses from two psychiatric hospitals (N = 297) and a medical unit (N = 408) of a general hospital completed a written survey including socio-demographic data and a measure of work-related stress (Nurse Stress Inventory). Findings: Compared to the nurses working in the general hospital, those working in the psychiatric setting had a higher level of stress in the domains of working environment and resources (p < .001) and patient care (p < .001), but lower workload and time (p < .001). Multivariate analyses revealed that college or higher level of education (β = .1, p < .001), exposure to violence in the past 6 months (β = .2, p < .001), longer working experience, and working in psychiatric hospitals were associated with high work-related stress (β = .2, p < .001). Practice Implications: Considering the harmful effects of work-related stress, specific stress management workshops and effective staff supportive initiatives for Chinese nurses are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-32
Number of pages6
JournalPerspectives in Psychiatric Care
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psychiatric Hospitals
General Hospitals
China
Nurses
Education
Workload
Psychiatry
Patient Care
Multivariate Analysis
Demography
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Medical ward(s)
  • Nurses
  • Psychiatric hospital
  • Work-related stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Qi, Y. K., Xiang, Y. T., An, F. R., Wang, J., Zeng, J. Y., Ungvari, G. S., ... Chiu, H. F. K. (2014). Nurses' Work-Related Stress in China: A Comparison Between Psychiatric and General Hospitals. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 50(1), 27-32. https://doi.org/10.1111/ppc.12020

Nurses' Work-Related Stress in China : A Comparison Between Psychiatric and General Hospitals. / Qi, Yun Ke; Xiang, Yu Tao; An, Feng Rong; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Jiao Ying; Ungvari, Gabor S.; Newhouse, Robin; Yu, Doris S F; Lai, Kelly Y C; Ding, Yan Ming; Yu, Liuyang; Zhang, Xiang Yang; Chiu, Helen F K.

In: Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, Vol. 50, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 27-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qi, YK, Xiang, YT, An, FR, Wang, J, Zeng, JY, Ungvari, GS, Newhouse, R, Yu, DSF, Lai, KYC, Ding, YM, Yu, L, Zhang, XY & Chiu, HFK 2014, 'Nurses' Work-Related Stress in China: A Comparison Between Psychiatric and General Hospitals', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 27-32. https://doi.org/10.1111/ppc.12020
Qi, Yun Ke ; Xiang, Yu Tao ; An, Feng Rong ; Wang, Jing ; Zeng, Jiao Ying ; Ungvari, Gabor S. ; Newhouse, Robin ; Yu, Doris S F ; Lai, Kelly Y C ; Ding, Yan Ming ; Yu, Liuyang ; Zhang, Xiang Yang ; Chiu, Helen F K. / Nurses' Work-Related Stress in China : A Comparison Between Psychiatric and General Hospitals. In: Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 2014 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 27-32.
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