Nutritional modulation of the expression of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases and alcohol metabolism

Min You, David Crabb

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases are believed to be important determinants of responses to ethanol. The strongest evidence for this assertion is the finding, replicated by many laboratories in many countries, that the inheritance of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) alleles encoding high activity enzymes are associated with lower prevalence of alcoholism and, conversely, that inheritance of the dominant negative mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) allele (ALDH2*2) is associated with a marked reduction in the risk of alcoholism. Although it has been postulated that the activity of these enzymes might also affect the risk of developing alcoholic liver disease, considerably less data support this notion. Given that the activity of these enzymes as determined by their isozyme type affects the risk of alcoholism, it is natural to ask if other influences on the activity of these enzymes might also affect responses to alcohol. Considerable interest has centered on the possibility that nutritional factors may affect the expression of these enzymes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNutrition and Alcohol
Subtitle of host publicationLinking Nutrient Interactions and Dietary Intake
PublisherCRC Press
Pages173-186
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9780203507636
ISBN (Print)0849316804, 9780849316807
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Aldehyde Dehydrogenase
Alcohol Dehydrogenase
Alcohols
Alcoholism
Enzymes
Alleles
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Risk Reduction Behavior
Isoenzymes
Ethanol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

You, M., & Crabb, D. (2003). Nutritional modulation of the expression of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases and alcohol metabolism. In Nutrition and Alcohol: Linking Nutrient Interactions and Dietary Intake (pp. 173-186). CRC Press.

Nutritional modulation of the expression of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases and alcohol metabolism. / You, Min; Crabb, David.

Nutrition and Alcohol: Linking Nutrient Interactions and Dietary Intake. CRC Press, 2003. p. 173-186.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

You, M & Crabb, D 2003, Nutritional modulation of the expression of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases and alcohol metabolism. in Nutrition and Alcohol: Linking Nutrient Interactions and Dietary Intake. CRC Press, pp. 173-186.
You M, Crabb D. Nutritional modulation of the expression of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases and alcohol metabolism. In Nutrition and Alcohol: Linking Nutrient Interactions and Dietary Intake. CRC Press. 2003. p. 173-186
You, Min ; Crabb, David. / Nutritional modulation of the expression of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases and alcohol metabolism. Nutrition and Alcohol: Linking Nutrient Interactions and Dietary Intake. CRC Press, 2003. pp. 173-186
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