Obesity and 10-year mortality in very old african americans and yoruba-nigerians

Exploring the obesity paradox

Daniel Clark, Sujuan Gao, Kathleen A. Lane, Christopher Callahan, Olusegun Baiyewu, Adesola Ogunniyi, Hugh Hendrie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. To compare the effect of obesity and related risk factors on 10-year mortality in two cohorts of older adults of African descent; one from the United States and one from Nigeria. Methods. Study participants were community residents aged 70 or older of African descent living in Indianapolis, Indiana (N = 1,269) or Ibadan, Nigeria (1,197). We compared survival curves between the two cohorts by obesity class and estimated the effect of obesity class on mortality in Cox proportional hazards models controlling for age, gender, alcohol use, and smoking history, and the cardiometabolic biomarkers blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and C-reactive protein. Results. We found that underweight was associated with an increased risk of death in both the Yoruba (hazards ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.63) and African American samples (hazards ratio = 2.49, 95% confidence interval: 1.40-4.43) compared with those with normal weight. The overweight and obese participants in both cohorts experienced survival similar to the normal weight participants. Controlling for cardiometabolic biomarkers had little effect on the obesity-specific hazard ratios in either cohort. Conclusions. Despite significant differences across these two cohorts in terms of obesity and biomarker levels, overall 10-year survival and obesity class-specific survival were remarkably similar.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1162-1169
Number of pages8
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume69
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

African Americans
Obesity
Mortality
Biomarkers
Nigeria
Confidence Intervals
Weights and Measures
Thinness
HDL Lipoproteins
LDL Lipoproteins
Proportional Hazards Models
C-Reactive Protein
Triglycerides
Smoking
History
Alcohols
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • African
  • Biomarkers
  • Mortality
  • Obesity
  • Older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Obesity and 10-year mortality in very old african americans and yoruba-nigerians: Exploring the obesity paradox",
abstract = "Background. To compare the effect of obesity and related risk factors on 10-year mortality in two cohorts of older adults of African descent; one from the United States and one from Nigeria. Methods. Study participants were community residents aged 70 or older of African descent living in Indianapolis, Indiana (N = 1,269) or Ibadan, Nigeria (1,197). We compared survival curves between the two cohorts by obesity class and estimated the effect of obesity class on mortality in Cox proportional hazards models controlling for age, gender, alcohol use, and smoking history, and the cardiometabolic biomarkers blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and C-reactive protein. Results. We found that underweight was associated with an increased risk of death in both the Yoruba (hazards ratio = 1.35, 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.12-1.63) and African American samples (hazards ratio = 2.49, 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.40-4.43) compared with those with normal weight. The overweight and obese participants in both cohorts experienced survival similar to the normal weight participants. Controlling for cardiometabolic biomarkers had little effect on the obesity-specific hazard ratios in either cohort. Conclusions. Despite significant differences across these two cohorts in terms of obesity and biomarker levels, overall 10-year survival and obesity class-specific survival were remarkably similar.",
keywords = "African, Biomarkers, Mortality, Obesity, Older adults",
author = "Daniel Clark and Sujuan Gao and Lane, {Kathleen A.} and Christopher Callahan and Olusegun Baiyewu and Adesola Ogunniyi and Hugh Hendrie",
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T1 - Obesity and 10-year mortality in very old african americans and yoruba-nigerians

T2 - Exploring the obesity paradox

AU - Clark, Daniel

AU - Gao, Sujuan

AU - Lane, Kathleen A.

AU - Callahan, Christopher

AU - Baiyewu, Olusegun

AU - Ogunniyi, Adesola

AU - Hendrie, Hugh

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background. To compare the effect of obesity and related risk factors on 10-year mortality in two cohorts of older adults of African descent; one from the United States and one from Nigeria. Methods. Study participants were community residents aged 70 or older of African descent living in Indianapolis, Indiana (N = 1,269) or Ibadan, Nigeria (1,197). We compared survival curves between the two cohorts by obesity class and estimated the effect of obesity class on mortality in Cox proportional hazards models controlling for age, gender, alcohol use, and smoking history, and the cardiometabolic biomarkers blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and C-reactive protein. Results. We found that underweight was associated with an increased risk of death in both the Yoruba (hazards ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.63) and African American samples (hazards ratio = 2.49, 95% confidence interval: 1.40-4.43) compared with those with normal weight. The overweight and obese participants in both cohorts experienced survival similar to the normal weight participants. Controlling for cardiometabolic biomarkers had little effect on the obesity-specific hazard ratios in either cohort. Conclusions. Despite significant differences across these two cohorts in terms of obesity and biomarker levels, overall 10-year survival and obesity class-specific survival were remarkably similar.

AB - Background. To compare the effect of obesity and related risk factors on 10-year mortality in two cohorts of older adults of African descent; one from the United States and one from Nigeria. Methods. Study participants were community residents aged 70 or older of African descent living in Indianapolis, Indiana (N = 1,269) or Ibadan, Nigeria (1,197). We compared survival curves between the two cohorts by obesity class and estimated the effect of obesity class on mortality in Cox proportional hazards models controlling for age, gender, alcohol use, and smoking history, and the cardiometabolic biomarkers blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and C-reactive protein. Results. We found that underweight was associated with an increased risk of death in both the Yoruba (hazards ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.63) and African American samples (hazards ratio = 2.49, 95% confidence interval: 1.40-4.43) compared with those with normal weight. The overweight and obese participants in both cohorts experienced survival similar to the normal weight participants. Controlling for cardiometabolic biomarkers had little effect on the obesity-specific hazard ratios in either cohort. Conclusions. Despite significant differences across these two cohorts in terms of obesity and biomarker levels, overall 10-year survival and obesity class-specific survival were remarkably similar.

KW - African

KW - Biomarkers

KW - Mortality

KW - Obesity

KW - Older adults

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