Obesity, But Not High-Fat Diet, Promotes Murine Pancreatic Cancer Growth

Patrick B. White, Kathryn M. Ziegler, Deborah A. Swartz-Basile, Sue S. Wang, Keith D. Lillemoe, Henry A. Pitt, Nicholas J. Zyromski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Obesity accelerates pancreatic cancer growth; the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood. This study evaluated the hypothesis that obesity, rather than high-fat diet, is responsible for accelerated pancreatic cancer growth. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were studied after 19 weeks of high-fat (60 % fat; n = 20) or low-fat (10 % fat; n = 10) diet and 5 weeks of Pan02 murine pancreatic cancer growth (flank). Results: By two-way ANOVA, diet did not (p = 0. 58), but body weight, significantly influenced tumor weight (p = 0. 01). Tumor weight correlated positively with body weight (R2 = 0. 562; p < 0. 001). Tumors in overweight mice were twice as large as those growing in lean mice (1. 2 ± 0. 2 g vs. 0. 6 ± . 01 g, p < 0. 01), had significantly fewer apoptotic cells than those in lean mice (0. 8 ± 0. 4 vs 2. 4 ± 0. 5; p < 0. 05), and greater adipocyte volume (3. 7 vs. 2. 2 %, p < 0. 05). Apoptosis (R2 = 0. 472; p = 0. 008) and serum adiponectin correlated negatively with tumor weight (R = 0. 45; p < 0. 05). Conclusions: These data suggest that body weight, and not high-fat diet, is responsible for accelerated murine pancreatic cancer growth observed in this model of diet-induced obesity. Decreased tumor apoptosis appears to play an important mechanistic role in this process. The concept that decreased apoptosis is potentiated by hypoadiponectinemia (seen in obesity) deserves further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1680-1685
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Keywords

  • Adipokines
  • Diet-induced obesity
  • High-fat diet
  • Obesity
  • Pancreatic cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

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    White, P. B., Ziegler, K. M., Swartz-Basile, D. A., Wang, S. S., Lillemoe, K. D., Pitt, H. A., & Zyromski, N. J. (2012). Obesity, But Not High-Fat Diet, Promotes Murine Pancreatic Cancer Growth. Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, 16(9), 1680-1685. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11605-012-1931-5