Obesity, gynecological factors, and abnormal mammography follow-up in minority and medically underserved women

Alecia Malin Fair, Debra Wujcik, Jin Mann S Lin, Ana Grau, Veronica Wilson, Victoria Champion, Wei Zheng, Kathleen M. Egan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The relationship between obesity and screening mammography adherence has been examined previously, yet few studies have investigated obesity as a potential mediator of timely follow-up of abnormal (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BIRADS-0]) mammography results in minority and medically underserved patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 35 women who did not return for follow-up >6 months from index abnormal mammography and 41 who returned for follow-up ≤6 months in Nashville, Tennessee. Patients with a BIRADS-0 mammography event in 2003-2004 were identified by chart review. Breast cancer risk factors were collected by telephone interview. Multivariate logistic regression was performed on selected factors with return for diagnostic follow-up. Results: Obesity and gynecological history were significant predictors of abnormal mammography resolution. A significantly higher frequency of obese women delayed return for mammography resolution compared with nonobese women (64.7% vs. 35.3%). A greater number of hysterectomized women returned for diagnostic follow-up compared with their counterparts without a hysterectomy (77.8% vs. 22.2%). Obese patients were more likely to delay follow-up >6 months (adjusted OR 4.09, p=0.02). Conversely, hysterectomized women were significantly more likely to return for timely mammography follow-up ≤6 months (adjusted OR 7.95, p=0.007). Conclusions: Study results suggest that weight status and gynecological history influence patients' decisions to participate in mammography follow-up studies. Strategies are necessary to reduce weight-related barriers to mammography follow-up in the healthcare system including provider training related to mammography screening of obese women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1033-1039
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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Mammography
Obesity
History
Weights and Measures
Vulnerable Populations
Hysterectomy
Information Systems
Breast
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Interviews
Breast Neoplasms
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Obesity, gynecological factors, and abnormal mammography follow-up in minority and medically underserved women. / Fair, Alecia Malin; Wujcik, Debra; Lin, Jin Mann S; Grau, Ana; Wilson, Veronica; Champion, Victoria; Zheng, Wei; Egan, Kathleen M.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 18, No. 7, 01.07.2009, p. 1033-1039.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fair, Alecia Malin ; Wujcik, Debra ; Lin, Jin Mann S ; Grau, Ana ; Wilson, Veronica ; Champion, Victoria ; Zheng, Wei ; Egan, Kathleen M. / Obesity, gynecological factors, and abnormal mammography follow-up in minority and medically underserved women. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 7. pp. 1033-1039.
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