Obesity is mediated by differential aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in mice fed a western diet

Joanna S. Kerley-Hamilton, Heidi W. Trask, Christian J A Ridley, Eric Dufour, Carol S. Ringelberg, Nilufer Nurinova, Diandra Wong, Karen L. Moodie, Samantha L. Shipman, Jason H. Moore, Murray Korc, Nicholas W. Shworak, Craig R. Tomlinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Obesity is a growing worldwide problem with genetic and environmental causes, and it is an underlying basis for many diseases. Studies have shown that the toxicant-activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) may disrupt fat metabolism and contribute to obesity. The AHR is a nuclear receptor/transcription factor that is best known for responding to environmental toxicant exposures to induce a battery of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes. Objectives: The intent of the work reported here was to test more directly the role of the AHR in obesity and fat metabolism in lieu of exogenous toxicants. Methods: We used two congenic mouse models that differ at the Ahr gene and encode AHRs with a 10-fold difference in signaling activity. The two mouse strains were fed either a low-fat (regular) diet or a high-fat (Western) diet. Results: The Western diet differentially affected body size, body fat:body mass ratios, liver size and liver metabolism, and liver mRNA and miRNA profiles. The regular diet had no significant differential effects. Conclusions: The results suggest that the AHR plays a large and broad role in obesity and associated complications, and importantly, may provide a simple and effective therapeutic strategy to combat obesity, heart disease, and other obesity-associated illnesses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1252-1259
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume120
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors
Obesity
Liver
Fats
Congenic Mice
Fat-Restricted Diet
Fat Body
Environmental Exposure
Body Size
High Fat Diet
Xenobiotics
Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
MicroRNAs
Genes
Western Diet
Adipose Tissue
Heart Diseases
Transcription Factors
Diet
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor
  • Gene-environment interaction
  • Liver
  • miRNA
  • mRNA
  • Obesity
  • Western diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kerley-Hamilton, J. S., Trask, H. W., Ridley, C. J. A., Dufour, E., Ringelberg, C. S., Nurinova, N., ... Tomlinson, C. R. (2012). Obesity is mediated by differential aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in mice fed a western diet. Environmental Health Perspectives, 120(9), 1252-1259. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205003

Obesity is mediated by differential aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in mice fed a western diet. / Kerley-Hamilton, Joanna S.; Trask, Heidi W.; Ridley, Christian J A; Dufour, Eric; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Nurinova, Nilufer; Wong, Diandra; Moodie, Karen L.; Shipman, Samantha L.; Moore, Jason H.; Korc, Murray; Shworak, Nicholas W.; Tomlinson, Craig R.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 120, No. 9, 2012, p. 1252-1259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kerley-Hamilton, JS, Trask, HW, Ridley, CJA, Dufour, E, Ringelberg, CS, Nurinova, N, Wong, D, Moodie, KL, Shipman, SL, Moore, JH, Korc, M, Shworak, NW & Tomlinson, CR 2012, 'Obesity is mediated by differential aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in mice fed a western diet', Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 120, no. 9, pp. 1252-1259. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205003
Kerley-Hamilton JS, Trask HW, Ridley CJA, Dufour E, Ringelberg CS, Nurinova N et al. Obesity is mediated by differential aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in mice fed a western diet. Environmental Health Perspectives. 2012;120(9):1252-1259. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205003
Kerley-Hamilton, Joanna S. ; Trask, Heidi W. ; Ridley, Christian J A ; Dufour, Eric ; Ringelberg, Carol S. ; Nurinova, Nilufer ; Wong, Diandra ; Moodie, Karen L. ; Shipman, Samantha L. ; Moore, Jason H. ; Korc, Murray ; Shworak, Nicholas W. ; Tomlinson, Craig R. / Obesity is mediated by differential aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in mice fed a western diet. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2012 ; Vol. 120, No. 9. pp. 1252-1259.
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