Obesity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and weight loss

T. S. Church, Monte Willis, E. L. Priest, M. J. LaMonte, C. P. Earnest, W. J. Wilkinson, D. A. Wilson, B. P. Giroir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Elevated macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been implicated as a causal mechanism in a number of disease conditions including cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and cancer. Excess body fat is associated with an increased risk of numerous health conditions including CVD, diabetes, and cancer. To our knowledge, the association between MIF and obesity status and the effect of weight loss on serum MIF concentrations have not been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of participation in a behavior-based weight loss program on MIF concentrations in obese individuals. SUBJECTS: Study participants were 71 men and women enrolled in The Cooper Institute Weight Management Program. Participants were predominantly female (68%, n = 48), middle-aged (46.5 ± 9.8 y), and severely obese (BMI = 43.0 ± 8.6). METHOD: Plasma MIF concentrations and other standard risk factors were measured before and after participation in a diet and physical activity based weight management program. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 8.5 ± 3.0 months with an average weight loss of 14.4 kg (P<0.001). The majority of clinical risk factors significantly improved at follow-up. Median levels of plasma MIF concentration were significantly lower at follow-up (median [IQR]; 5.1[3.6-10.3]) compared to baseline (8.4 [4.3-48.8]; P = 0.0005). The percentage of participants with plasma MIF concentration ≥19.5 mg/nl (highest tertile at baseline) decreased from 33.8 to 5.6% (P<0.001). Further, elevated baseline plasma MIF concentration was associated with markers of β-cell dysfunction and reductions in MIF were associated with improvements in β-cell function. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating MIF concentrations are elevated in obese but otherwise healthy individuals; however, this elevation in MIF is not uniform across individuals. In obese individuals with elevated circulating MIF concentrations, participation in physical activity and a dietary-focused weight management program resulted in substantial reduction in MIF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-681
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors
Weight Loss
Obesity
Weights and Measures
Cardiovascular Diseases
Exercise
Weight Reduction Programs
Adipose Tissue
Neoplasms
Diet
Health
Serum

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • HOMA
  • Intervention
  • MIF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Church, T. S., Willis, M., Priest, E. L., LaMonte, M. J., Earnest, C. P., Wilkinson, W. J., ... Giroir, B. P. (2005). Obesity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and weight loss. International Journal of Obesity, 29(6), 675-681. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802942

Obesity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and weight loss. / Church, T. S.; Willis, Monte; Priest, E. L.; LaMonte, M. J.; Earnest, C. P.; Wilkinson, W. J.; Wilson, D. A.; Giroir, B. P.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 29, No. 6, 01.06.2005, p. 675-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Church, TS, Willis, M, Priest, EL, LaMonte, MJ, Earnest, CP, Wilkinson, WJ, Wilson, DA & Giroir, BP 2005, 'Obesity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and weight loss', International Journal of Obesity, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 675-681. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802942
Church TS, Willis M, Priest EL, LaMonte MJ, Earnest CP, Wilkinson WJ et al. Obesity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and weight loss. International Journal of Obesity. 2005 Jun 1;29(6):675-681. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802942
Church, T. S. ; Willis, Monte ; Priest, E. L. ; LaMonte, M. J. ; Earnest, C. P. ; Wilkinson, W. J. ; Wilson, D. A. ; Giroir, B. P. / Obesity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and weight loss. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2005 ; Vol. 29, No. 6. pp. 675-681.
@article{fe71b117a2b14c5cb501bcdf5289aaa3,
title = "Obesity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and weight loss",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Elevated macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been implicated as a causal mechanism in a number of disease conditions including cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and cancer. Excess body fat is associated with an increased risk of numerous health conditions including CVD, diabetes, and cancer. To our knowledge, the association between MIF and obesity status and the effect of weight loss on serum MIF concentrations have not been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of participation in a behavior-based weight loss program on MIF concentrations in obese individuals. SUBJECTS: Study participants were 71 men and women enrolled in The Cooper Institute Weight Management Program. Participants were predominantly female (68{\%}, n = 48), middle-aged (46.5 ± 9.8 y), and severely obese (BMI = 43.0 ± 8.6). METHOD: Plasma MIF concentrations and other standard risk factors were measured before and after participation in a diet and physical activity based weight management program. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 8.5 ± 3.0 months with an average weight loss of 14.4 kg (P<0.001). The majority of clinical risk factors significantly improved at follow-up. Median levels of plasma MIF concentration were significantly lower at follow-up (median [IQR]; 5.1[3.6-10.3]) compared to baseline (8.4 [4.3-48.8]; P = 0.0005). The percentage of participants with plasma MIF concentration ≥19.5 mg/nl (highest tertile at baseline) decreased from 33.8 to 5.6{\%} (P<0.001). Further, elevated baseline plasma MIF concentration was associated with markers of β-cell dysfunction and reductions in MIF were associated with improvements in β-cell function. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating MIF concentrations are elevated in obese but otherwise healthy individuals; however, this elevation in MIF is not uniform across individuals. In obese individuals with elevated circulating MIF concentrations, participation in physical activity and a dietary-focused weight management program resulted in substantial reduction in MIF.",
keywords = "Cytokines, HOMA, Intervention, MIF",
author = "Church, {T. S.} and Monte Willis and Priest, {E. L.} and LaMonte, {M. J.} and Earnest, {C. P.} and Wilkinson, {W. J.} and Wilson, {D. A.} and Giroir, {B. P.}",
year = "2005",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/sj.ijo.0802942",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "675--681",
journal = "International Journal of Obesity",
issn = "0307-0565",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obesity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and weight loss

AU - Church, T. S.

AU - Willis, Monte

AU - Priest, E. L.

AU - LaMonte, M. J.

AU - Earnest, C. P.

AU - Wilkinson, W. J.

AU - Wilson, D. A.

AU - Giroir, B. P.

PY - 2005/6/1

Y1 - 2005/6/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Elevated macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been implicated as a causal mechanism in a number of disease conditions including cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and cancer. Excess body fat is associated with an increased risk of numerous health conditions including CVD, diabetes, and cancer. To our knowledge, the association between MIF and obesity status and the effect of weight loss on serum MIF concentrations have not been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of participation in a behavior-based weight loss program on MIF concentrations in obese individuals. SUBJECTS: Study participants were 71 men and women enrolled in The Cooper Institute Weight Management Program. Participants were predominantly female (68%, n = 48), middle-aged (46.5 ± 9.8 y), and severely obese (BMI = 43.0 ± 8.6). METHOD: Plasma MIF concentrations and other standard risk factors were measured before and after participation in a diet and physical activity based weight management program. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 8.5 ± 3.0 months with an average weight loss of 14.4 kg (P<0.001). The majority of clinical risk factors significantly improved at follow-up. Median levels of plasma MIF concentration were significantly lower at follow-up (median [IQR]; 5.1[3.6-10.3]) compared to baseline (8.4 [4.3-48.8]; P = 0.0005). The percentage of participants with plasma MIF concentration ≥19.5 mg/nl (highest tertile at baseline) decreased from 33.8 to 5.6% (P<0.001). Further, elevated baseline plasma MIF concentration was associated with markers of β-cell dysfunction and reductions in MIF were associated with improvements in β-cell function. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating MIF concentrations are elevated in obese but otherwise healthy individuals; however, this elevation in MIF is not uniform across individuals. In obese individuals with elevated circulating MIF concentrations, participation in physical activity and a dietary-focused weight management program resulted in substantial reduction in MIF.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Elevated macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been implicated as a causal mechanism in a number of disease conditions including cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and cancer. Excess body fat is associated with an increased risk of numerous health conditions including CVD, diabetes, and cancer. To our knowledge, the association between MIF and obesity status and the effect of weight loss on serum MIF concentrations have not been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of participation in a behavior-based weight loss program on MIF concentrations in obese individuals. SUBJECTS: Study participants were 71 men and women enrolled in The Cooper Institute Weight Management Program. Participants were predominantly female (68%, n = 48), middle-aged (46.5 ± 9.8 y), and severely obese (BMI = 43.0 ± 8.6). METHOD: Plasma MIF concentrations and other standard risk factors were measured before and after participation in a diet and physical activity based weight management program. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 8.5 ± 3.0 months with an average weight loss of 14.4 kg (P<0.001). The majority of clinical risk factors significantly improved at follow-up. Median levels of plasma MIF concentration were significantly lower at follow-up (median [IQR]; 5.1[3.6-10.3]) compared to baseline (8.4 [4.3-48.8]; P = 0.0005). The percentage of participants with plasma MIF concentration ≥19.5 mg/nl (highest tertile at baseline) decreased from 33.8 to 5.6% (P<0.001). Further, elevated baseline plasma MIF concentration was associated with markers of β-cell dysfunction and reductions in MIF were associated with improvements in β-cell function. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating MIF concentrations are elevated in obese but otherwise healthy individuals; however, this elevation in MIF is not uniform across individuals. In obese individuals with elevated circulating MIF concentrations, participation in physical activity and a dietary-focused weight management program resulted in substantial reduction in MIF.

KW - Cytokines

KW - HOMA

KW - Intervention

KW - MIF

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20044382686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=20044382686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/sj.ijo.0802942

DO - 10.1038/sj.ijo.0802942

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 675

EP - 681

JO - International Journal of Obesity

JF - International Journal of Obesity

SN - 0307-0565

IS - 6

ER -