Occupational necessity and educational invention

Resident teaching of radiologic technologists

Richard Gunderman, Ronald Fraley, Valerie Jackson, Susan Robinson, Kenneth Williamson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives. Radiology faces a severe and growing shortage of radiologic technologists. One way of redressing this problem is to improve the quality of education provided to radiologic technology students. Yet growing clinical demands increasingly erode faculty time for teaching. This study examined whether radiology residents could provide equivalent instruction in radiologic technology at lower cost, and whether such experience could enhance residents' interest in teaching as part of their careers. Materials and Methods. Course evaluation forms completed by the students in a required radiologic pathology course were reviewed, and student-reported faculty and resident performances in teaching were compared. Residents also were surveyed for their reactions to the experience of teaching this course. Results. Ninety percent of students (27 of 30) either agreed or strongly agreed that the course was well taught by radiology faculty members, and 97% (29 of 30) either agreed or strongly agreed that the course was well taught by radiology residents. The total direct cost of instruction by radiology residents was 73% lower than the cost of instruction by faculty. Residents who participated in teaching found the experience worthwhile, and they described a wide variety of personal and educational benefits. Conclusion. Involving radiology residents in teaching can help redress the growing shortage of radiologic technologists, relieve some of the pressure on faculty time, and contribute to the professional development of the next generation of radiologists.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)404-407
Number of pages4
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

Fingerprint

Radiology
Teaching
Radiologic Technology
Students
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pathology
Education
Pressure

Keywords

  • Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Occupational necessity and educational invention : Resident teaching of radiologic technologists. / Gunderman, Richard; Fraley, Ronald; Jackson, Valerie; Robinson, Susan; Williamson, Kenneth.

In: Academic Radiology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 404-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gunderman, Richard ; Fraley, Ronald ; Jackson, Valerie ; Robinson, Susan ; Williamson, Kenneth. / Occupational necessity and educational invention : Resident teaching of radiologic technologists. In: Academic Radiology. 2003 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 404-407.
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