Ocular blood flow measurements and their importance in glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration

Hanna J. Garzozi, Nir Shoham, Hak Sung Chung, Larry Kagemann, Alon Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This survey of methods for assessing ocular hemodynamics in glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration is not complete, but it does cover those likely to be encountered in the literature. A fundamental problem in getting to grips with the ocular blood flow literature is the difficulty in comparing the results of similar studies employing different assessment techniques. As evident from the discussion above, each technique evaluates a portion of the ocular circulation in a distinct way. Some of the methods overlap with regard to the tissues that can be used for examination, while others are directed at entirely different parts of the ocular vasculature. Despite these difficulties, hemodynamic studies of glaucoma and AMD are likely to grow in importance. On the basis of accumulating epidemiological and clinical evidence, it is becoming apparent that intraocular pressure is not the sole etiological factor in glaucoma, and retinal pigment epithelium senescence is not the sole etiological factor in AMD. Circumstantial evidence of vascular involvement in glaucoma and AMD has now been bolstered by experimental evidence. If the current pace of refinement of newly established technologies for evaluating ocular blood flow is maintained, they will soon be ready for deployment in the clinic. The only problem is the availability of expensive instruments and trained personnel. The ultimate beneficiaries of work in this area will not be researchers, but patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)443-448
Number of pages6
JournalIsrael Medical Association Journal
Volume3
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Macular Degeneration
Hemodynamics
Flow measurement
Glaucoma
Blood
Retinal Pigments
Pigments
Availability
Personnel
Tissue
Retinal Pigment Epithelium
Intraocular Pressure
Blood Vessels
Research Personnel
Technology

Keywords

  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Doppler
  • Glaucoma
  • Imaging
  • Ocular hemodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Ocular blood flow measurements and their importance in glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. / Garzozi, Hanna J.; Shoham, Nir; Chung, Hak Sung; Kagemann, Larry; Harris, Alon.

In: Israel Medical Association Journal, Vol. 3, No. 6, 2001, p. 443-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garzozi, Hanna J. ; Shoham, Nir ; Chung, Hak Sung ; Kagemann, Larry ; Harris, Alon. / Ocular blood flow measurements and their importance in glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. In: Israel Medical Association Journal. 2001 ; Vol. 3, No. 6. pp. 443-448.
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