Offspring of parents with an alcohol use disorder prefer higher levels of brain alcohol exposure in experiments involving computer-assisted self-infusion of ethanol (CASE)

Ulrich S. Zimmermann, Inge Mick, Manfred Laucht, Victor Vitvitskiy, Martin H. Plawecki, Karl F. Mann, Sean O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Acute alcohol effects may differ in social drinkers with a positive family history of alcohol use disorders (FHP) compared to FH negative (FHN) controls. Objectives: To investigate whether FHP subjects prefer higher levels of brain alcohol exposure than do FHN controls. Materials and methods: Twenty-two young healthy nondependent social drinkers participated in two identical sessions of computer-assisted self-infusion of ethanol (CASE); the first for practicing the procedures, the second to test hypotheses. All 12 FHP (four women) and ten FHN (three women) participants received a priming exposure, increasing arterial blood alcohol concentration (aBAC) to 30 mg% at 10 min and decreasing it to 15 mg% at 25 min. A 2-h self-administration period followed, during which only the subjects could increase their aBAC by pressing a button connected to a computer controlling the infusion pump. Infusion rate profiles were calculated instantaneously to increase aBAC by precisely 7.5 mg% within 2.5 min after each button press, followed by a steady descent. Subjects were instructed to produce the same alcohol effects as they would do at a weekend party. Results: The mean and maximum aBAC during the self-administration period and the number of alcohol requests (NOAR) were significantly higher in the FHP vs. FHN participants. Conclusions: This is the first laboratory experiment demonstrating higher alcohol self-administration in FHP compared to FHN subjects. A practice session increases the sensitivity of CASE experiments for detection of subtle differences in human alcohol self-administration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)689-697
Number of pages9
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume202
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

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Ethanol
Parents
Alcohols
Self Administration
Brain
Infusion Pumps
Blood Alcohol Content

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • CASE
  • Ethanol
  • Freibier
  • Genetic risk
  • Self-administration
  • Sensitivity
  • Tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Offspring of parents with an alcohol use disorder prefer higher levels of brain alcohol exposure in experiments involving computer-assisted self-infusion of ethanol (CASE). / Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Mick, Inge; Laucht, Manfred; Vitvitskiy, Victor; Plawecki, Martin H.; Mann, Karl F.; O'Connor, Sean.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 202, No. 4, 03.2009, p. 689-697.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zimmermann, Ulrich S. ; Mick, Inge ; Laucht, Manfred ; Vitvitskiy, Victor ; Plawecki, Martin H. ; Mann, Karl F. ; O'Connor, Sean. / Offspring of parents with an alcohol use disorder prefer higher levels of brain alcohol exposure in experiments involving computer-assisted self-infusion of ethanol (CASE). In: Psychopharmacology. 2009 ; Vol. 202, No. 4. pp. 689-697.
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