Organizational and financial characteristics of health plans: Are they related to primary care performance?

Dana Gelb Safran, William H. Rogers, Alvin R. Tarlov, Thomas Inui, Deborah A. Taira, Jana E. Montgomery, John E. Ware, Charles P. Slavin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Primary care performance has been shown to differ under different models of health care delivery, even among various models of managed care. Pervasive changes in our nation's health care delivery systems, including the emergence of new forms of managed care, compel more current data. Objective: To compare the primary care received by patients in each of 5 models of managed care (managed indemnity, point of service, network-model health maintenance organization [HMO], group-model HMO, and staff-model HMO) and identify specific characteristics of health plans associated with performance differences. Methods: Cross-sectional observational study of Massachusetts adults who reported having a regular personal physician and for whom plan-type was known (n = 6018). Participants completed a validated questionnaire measuring 7 defining characteristics of primary care. Senior health plan executives provided information about financial and nonfinancial features of the plan's contractual arrangements with physicians. Results: The managed indemnity system performed most favorably, with the highest adjusted mean scores for 8 of 10 measures (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume160
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 10 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Health Maintenance Organizations
Managed Care Programs
Primary Health Care
Insurance
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Physicians
Observational Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Safran, D. G., Rogers, W. H., Tarlov, A. R., Inui, T., Taira, D. A., Montgomery, J. E., ... Slavin, C. P. (2000). Organizational and financial characteristics of health plans: Are they related to primary care performance? Archives of Internal Medicine, 160(1), 69-76.

Organizational and financial characteristics of health plans : Are they related to primary care performance? / Safran, Dana Gelb; Rogers, William H.; Tarlov, Alvin R.; Inui, Thomas; Taira, Deborah A.; Montgomery, Jana E.; Ware, John E.; Slavin, Charles P.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 160, No. 1, 10.01.2000, p. 69-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Safran, DG, Rogers, WH, Tarlov, AR, Inui, T, Taira, DA, Montgomery, JE, Ware, JE & Slavin, CP 2000, 'Organizational and financial characteristics of health plans: Are they related to primary care performance?', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 160, no. 1, pp. 69-76.
Safran, Dana Gelb ; Rogers, William H. ; Tarlov, Alvin R. ; Inui, Thomas ; Taira, Deborah A. ; Montgomery, Jana E. ; Ware, John E. ; Slavin, Charles P. / Organizational and financial characteristics of health plans : Are they related to primary care performance?. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 160, No. 1. pp. 69-76.
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