Osteoarthritic changes in canine articular cartilage, subchondral bone, and synovium fifty-four months after transection of the anterior cruciate ligament

Kenneth D. Brandt, Stephen L. Myers, David Burr, Marjorie Albrecht

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Abstract

Anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) in the dog results in osteophyte formation and in morphologic, metabolic, biochemical, and biomechanical changes in the articular cartilage of the unstable knee that mimic those of human osteoarthritis (OA). However, in dogs studied up to 2 years after ACLT, the changes have appeared to be self-limiting, which has led to the suggestion that this is a model of cartilage damage and repair, rather than of OA. To ascertain whether changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone of dogs subjected to ACLT lead to progressive changes of OA, we studied 3 dogs for 54 months after ACLT. Arthrotomy was performed in the dogs to visualize and then transect the anterior cruciate ligament. When the dogs were killed, full-thickness ulceration of the articular cartilage was seen on the medial femoral condyle and tibial plateau of the unstable knee, while cartilage in other regions was thicker than that of the contralateral knee, consistent with hypertrophic cartilage repair. Synovial infiltration by mononuclear cells was not more severe than that seen in dogs killed at earlier intervals after ACLT, although gross fibrotic thickening of the capsule was apparent in each dog. Histomorphometric studies revealed a marked increase in subchondral bone volume and active bone formation. These findings show that the changes that develop in the canine knee joint after ACLT are progressive and are unambiguously those of OA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1560-1570
Number of pages11
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume34
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1991

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Synovial Membrane
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Articular Cartilage
Canidae
Dogs
Bone and Bones
Osteoarthritis
Cartilage
Knee
Osteophyte
Knee Joint
Thigh
Osteogenesis
Capsules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Osteoarthritic changes in canine articular cartilage, subchondral bone, and synovium fifty-four months after transection of the anterior cruciate ligament. / Brandt, Kenneth D.; Myers, Stephen L.; Burr, David; Albrecht, Marjorie.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 34, No. 12, 12.1991, p. 1560-1570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brandt, Kenneth D. ; Myers, Stephen L. ; Burr, David ; Albrecht, Marjorie. / Osteoarthritic changes in canine articular cartilage, subchondral bone, and synovium fifty-four months after transection of the anterior cruciate ligament. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 1991 ; Vol. 34, No. 12. pp. 1560-1570.
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