Osteoclast-like cells form in long-term human bone marrow but not in peripheral blood cultures

N. Takahashi, T. Kukita, B. R. MacDonald, A. Bird, G. R. Mundy, L. M. McManus, M. Miller, A. Boyde, S. J. Jones, G. David Roodman

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Abstract

Transplantation studies have suggested that peripheral blood mononuclear cells contain precursors for osteoclasts. Thus we tested the capacity of peripheral blood monocytes to form osteoclasts in long-term culture. We have reported previously that mononuclear cells from feline, baboon, and human marrow form osteoclast-line cells in long term cultures. Further, the formation of these cells is increased in response to bone resorption stimulatory agents such as PTH, interleukin 1, and transforming growth factor α. We now report that these cells show characteristic cytoplasmic contraction with calcitonin and form resorption lacunae when cultured on sperm whale dentine. Thus, these bone marrow-derived multinucleated cells fulfill the functional criteria for osteoclasts. Although cultured peripheral blood monocytes can be induced to form multinucleated cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, these cells did not show similar responses to the osteotropic factors as multinucleated cells formed in the bone marrow cultures multinucleated cells. These results indicate that osteoclasts or cells closely related to osteoclasts form in long-term human bone marrow cultures. In contrast, few mononuclear cells in the peripheral blood appear capable of forming osteoclasts under the culture conditions used in these experiments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-550
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume83
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Osteoclasts
Bone Marrow
Monocytes
Sperm Whale
Blood Culture
Papio
Calcitriol
Felidae
Calcitonin
Transforming Growth Factors
Dentin
Bone Resorption
Interleukin-1
Blood Cells
Cell Culture Techniques
Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Takahashi, N., Kukita, T., MacDonald, B. R., Bird, A., Mundy, G. R., McManus, L. M., ... Roodman, G. D. (1989). Osteoclast-like cells form in long-term human bone marrow but not in peripheral blood cultures. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 83(2), 543-550.

Osteoclast-like cells form in long-term human bone marrow but not in peripheral blood cultures. / Takahashi, N.; Kukita, T.; MacDonald, B. R.; Bird, A.; Mundy, G. R.; McManus, L. M.; Miller, M.; Boyde, A.; Jones, S. J.; Roodman, G. David.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 83, No. 2, 1989, p. 543-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takahashi, N, Kukita, T, MacDonald, BR, Bird, A, Mundy, GR, McManus, LM, Miller, M, Boyde, A, Jones, SJ & Roodman, GD 1989, 'Osteoclast-like cells form in long-term human bone marrow but not in peripheral blood cultures', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 83, no. 2, pp. 543-550.
Takahashi N, Kukita T, MacDonald BR, Bird A, Mundy GR, McManus LM et al. Osteoclast-like cells form in long-term human bone marrow but not in peripheral blood cultures. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1989;83(2):543-550.
Takahashi, N. ; Kukita, T. ; MacDonald, B. R. ; Bird, A. ; Mundy, G. R. ; McManus, L. M. ; Miller, M. ; Boyde, A. ; Jones, S. J. ; Roodman, G. David. / Osteoclast-like cells form in long-term human bone marrow but not in peripheral blood cultures. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1989 ; Vol. 83, No. 2. pp. 543-550.
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