"Our Depression is Different"

Experiences and Perceptions of Depression in Young Black Men with a History of Incarceration

Danielle E K Perkins, Patricia Kelly, Sue Lasiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One in three Black men in the US faces difficulties obtaining employment, housing and maintaining self-sufficiency post incarceration. Felony records result in considerable social and economic vulnerability, placing many young Black men at risk for depression. Little is known about depression in Black men with felony records. Twenty Black men with a history of incarceration were interviewed to explore perceptions and experiences of depression. Emergent themes were anger and negativity, depression is weakness, invisible depression, being strong and going on, and our depression is different. Findings have implications for clinicians who initiate ongoing therapeutic relationships with young Black men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-173
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Psychiatric Nursing
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Depression
Anger
Economics
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

"Our Depression is Different" : Experiences and Perceptions of Depression in Young Black Men with a History of Incarceration. / Perkins, Danielle E K; Kelly, Patricia; Lasiter, Sue.

In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 28, No. 3, 2014, p. 167-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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