Overview of DNA repair pathways, current targets, and clinical trials bench to clinic

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite a longstanding understanding that many endogenous and exogenous agents can damage DNA, knowledge of how DNA repairs itself was largely an academic pursuit until the last two decades. The ongoing molecular characterization of the DNA damage response (DDR) and pathway crosstalk is invaluable in helping scientists learn how to modulate DNA repair activities therapeutically-ultimately translating discoveries into standalone or combination treatments, chemosensitizers or radiosensitizers. The study of DNA repair is also uncovering synthetic lethalities that are induced when an inhibitor capitalizes on a tumor-specific dysfunction or mutation. Although these targeted anticancer treatments are designed to cause less toxicity to normal cells, we still have much to learn before we can fully and optimally exploit this type of intervention. This chapter summarizes the history of DNA repair, explains important "firsts" in the field of DNA repair inhibition, overviews all DNA repair pathways, and suggests future directions for DNA repair inhibition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDNA Repair in Cancer Therapy: Molecular Targets and Clinical Applications: Second Edition
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages1-54
Number of pages54
ISBN (Print)9780128035825
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 21 2016

Fingerprint

DNA Repair
Clinical Trials
DNA Damage
History
Mutation
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Checkpoints
  • Damage response
  • DNA repair
  • Repair inhibitors
  • Synthetic lethality
  • Targeted therapy
  • Translational science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kelley, M., & Fishel, M. (2016). Overview of DNA repair pathways, current targets, and clinical trials bench to clinic. In DNA Repair in Cancer Therapy: Molecular Targets and Clinical Applications: Second Edition (pp. 1-54). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803582-5.00001-2

Overview of DNA repair pathways, current targets, and clinical trials bench to clinic. / Kelley, Mark; Fishel, Melissa.

DNA Repair in Cancer Therapy: Molecular Targets and Clinical Applications: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2016. p. 1-54.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kelley, M & Fishel, M 2016, Overview of DNA repair pathways, current targets, and clinical trials bench to clinic. in DNA Repair in Cancer Therapy: Molecular Targets and Clinical Applications: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., pp. 1-54. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803582-5.00001-2
Kelley M, Fishel M. Overview of DNA repair pathways, current targets, and clinical trials bench to clinic. In DNA Repair in Cancer Therapy: Molecular Targets and Clinical Applications: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc. 2016. p. 1-54 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803582-5.00001-2
Kelley, Mark ; Fishel, Melissa. / Overview of DNA repair pathways, current targets, and clinical trials bench to clinic. DNA Repair in Cancer Therapy: Molecular Targets and Clinical Applications: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2016. pp. 1-54
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