Pain Self-Management in HIV-Infected Individuals with Chronic Pain: A Qualitative Study

Jessica S. Merlin, Melonie Walcott, Robert Kerns, Matthew J. Bair, Kathryn L. Burgio, Janet M. Turan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Chronic pain in individuals with HIV is a common, impairing condition. Behavioral interventions for chronic pain specifically tailored to this population have yet to be developed. We assert that understanding self-management strategies already used by persons living with these conditions is an essential first step, and is the objective of this investigation. Design: We conducted a thematic analysis of qualitative data from 25 in-depth interviews with individuals with HIV and chronic pain. Results: The primary pain self-management strategies articulated by participants were: physical activity; cognitive and spiritual strategies; spending time with family and friends and social support; avoidance of physical/social activity; medication-centric pain management; and substance use. Conclusions: Some of these strategies may be viewed as beneficial and overlap with known HIV self-management strategies (cognitive strategies), whereas others may have negative health consequences (substance use). Interventions that incorporate healthy self-management strategies may be particularly effective in improving both HIV and pain outcomes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)706-714
Number of pages9
JournalPain Medicine (United States)
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Pain Management
Self Care
Chronic Pain
HIV
Exercise
Social Conditions
Social Support
Interviews
Pain
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Chronic Pain
  • HIV
  • Pain Psychology
  • Self-Management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Pain Self-Management in HIV-Infected Individuals with Chronic Pain : A Qualitative Study. / Merlin, Jessica S.; Walcott, Melonie; Kerns, Robert; Bair, Matthew J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Turan, Janet M.

In: Pain Medicine (United States), Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 706-714.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Merlin, Jessica S. ; Walcott, Melonie ; Kerns, Robert ; Bair, Matthew ; Burgio, Kathryn L. ; Turan, Janet M. / Pain Self-Management in HIV-Infected Individuals with Chronic Pain : A Qualitative Study. In: Pain Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 706-714.
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