Paradoxical embolism: An elusive diagnosis

T. G. Ferry, M. V. Pisano, T. A. Pritzl, D. S. Wilkes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The circumstances that favor the development of pulmonary embolic disease are to a large extent known. Still, the condition is often misdiagnosed, because its manifestations are varied and not specific. Especially complicated are situations involving paradoxical embolism, in which simultaneous cardiopulmonary and neurologic disease can occur. Paradoxical embolism was once considered rare and was usually identified at autopsy. The case described here is one of the growing number in which a paradoxical embolus was diagnosed antemortem. The difficulty of this diagnosis is apparent, but so is the potential of transesophageal echocardiography to facilitate it.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)384-386
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Critical Illness
Volume14
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1999

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Paradoxical Embolism
Transesophageal Echocardiography
Nervous System Diseases
Embolism
Diagnostic Errors
Lung Diseases
Autopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Ferry, T. G., Pisano, M. V., Pritzl, T. A., & Wilkes, D. S. (1999). Paradoxical embolism: An elusive diagnosis. Journal of Critical Illness, 14(7), 384-386.

Paradoxical embolism : An elusive diagnosis. / Ferry, T. G.; Pisano, M. V.; Pritzl, T. A.; Wilkes, D. S.

In: Journal of Critical Illness, Vol. 14, No. 7, 1999, p. 384-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferry, TG, Pisano, MV, Pritzl, TA & Wilkes, DS 1999, 'Paradoxical embolism: An elusive diagnosis', Journal of Critical Illness, vol. 14, no. 7, pp. 384-386.
Ferry TG, Pisano MV, Pritzl TA, Wilkes DS. Paradoxical embolism: An elusive diagnosis. Journal of Critical Illness. 1999;14(7):384-386.
Ferry, T. G. ; Pisano, M. V. ; Pritzl, T. A. ; Wilkes, D. S. / Paradoxical embolism : An elusive diagnosis. In: Journal of Critical Illness. 1999 ; Vol. 14, No. 7. pp. 384-386.
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