Parent health literacy, depression, and risk for pediatric injury

Erika R. Cheng, Nerissa Bauer, Stephen Downs, Lee M. Sanders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Population-wide research on the impact of parent health literacy to children's health outcomes is limited. We assessed the relationship of low parent health literacy to a range of pediatric health risks within a large cohort of primary care patients. METHODS: Data were from 17 845 English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children aged =7 years presenting for well-child care. We used a 3-item screener to measure health literacy. Outcomes included secondhand smoke exposure, asthma treatment nonadherence, parent depression, child-rearing practices, injury prevention, and parent first-aid knowledge. We summarized study variables with descriptive statistics and then performed multivariable logistic regression to identify associations between low parent literacy and our dependent measures. RESULTS: Mean child age was 4.8 years (SD 3.7); 36.5% of parent respondents had low health literacy. In models adjusted for child gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, age, and parent language preference, low parent health literacy was related to a range of pediatric health risks, including parent depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.48), firearm access (AOR 1.68; 1.49-1.89), not having a working smoke detector (AOR 3.54; 2.74-4.58), and lack of first-aid knowledge about choking (AOR 1.67; 1.44-1.93) and burns (AOR 1.45; 1.29-1.63). Children of parents with low health literacy were also more likely to watch >2 hours of television per day (AOR 1.27; 1.17-1.36). CONCLUSIONS: Low parent health literacy is independently and significantly related to parent depression, child television viewing, and at-risk family behaviors associated with child injury. Use of low-literacy approaches to health-behavior interventions may be essential to address common child morbidities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20160025
JournalPediatrics
Volume138
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Depression
Pediatrics
Odds Ratio
Wounds and Injuries
First Aid
Television
Health
Parents
Child Rearing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Firearms
Airway Obstruction
Child Care
Risk-Taking
Insurance
Burns
Smoke
Primary Health Care
Language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Parent health literacy, depression, and risk for pediatric injury. / Cheng, Erika R.; Bauer, Nerissa; Downs, Stephen; Sanders, Lee M.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 138, No. 1, e20160025, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, Erika R. ; Bauer, Nerissa ; Downs, Stephen ; Sanders, Lee M. / Parent health literacy, depression, and risk for pediatric injury. In: Pediatrics. 2016 ; Vol. 138, No. 1.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Population-wide research on the impact of parent health literacy to children's health outcomes is limited. We assessed the relationship of low parent health literacy to a range of pediatric health risks within a large cohort of primary care patients. METHODS: Data were from 17 845 English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children aged =7 years presenting for well-child care. We used a 3-item screener to measure health literacy. Outcomes included secondhand smoke exposure, asthma treatment nonadherence, parent depression, child-rearing practices, injury prevention, and parent first-aid knowledge. We summarized study variables with descriptive statistics and then performed multivariable logistic regression to identify associations between low parent literacy and our dependent measures. RESULTS: Mean child age was 4.8 years (SD 3.7); 36.5{\%} of parent respondents had low health literacy. In models adjusted for child gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, age, and parent language preference, low parent health literacy was related to a range of pediatric health risks, including parent depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.32; 95{\%} confidence interval 1.18-1.48), firearm access (AOR 1.68; 1.49-1.89), not having a working smoke detector (AOR 3.54; 2.74-4.58), and lack of first-aid knowledge about choking (AOR 1.67; 1.44-1.93) and burns (AOR 1.45; 1.29-1.63). Children of parents with low health literacy were also more likely to watch >2 hours of television per day (AOR 1.27; 1.17-1.36). CONCLUSIONS: Low parent health literacy is independently and significantly related to parent depression, child television viewing, and at-risk family behaviors associated with child injury. Use of low-literacy approaches to health-behavior interventions may be essential to address common child morbidities.",
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N2 - BACKGROUND: Population-wide research on the impact of parent health literacy to children's health outcomes is limited. We assessed the relationship of low parent health literacy to a range of pediatric health risks within a large cohort of primary care patients. METHODS: Data were from 17 845 English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children aged =7 years presenting for well-child care. We used a 3-item screener to measure health literacy. Outcomes included secondhand smoke exposure, asthma treatment nonadherence, parent depression, child-rearing practices, injury prevention, and parent first-aid knowledge. We summarized study variables with descriptive statistics and then performed multivariable logistic regression to identify associations between low parent literacy and our dependent measures. RESULTS: Mean child age was 4.8 years (SD 3.7); 36.5% of parent respondents had low health literacy. In models adjusted for child gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, age, and parent language preference, low parent health literacy was related to a range of pediatric health risks, including parent depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.48), firearm access (AOR 1.68; 1.49-1.89), not having a working smoke detector (AOR 3.54; 2.74-4.58), and lack of first-aid knowledge about choking (AOR 1.67; 1.44-1.93) and burns (AOR 1.45; 1.29-1.63). Children of parents with low health literacy were also more likely to watch >2 hours of television per day (AOR 1.27; 1.17-1.36). CONCLUSIONS: Low parent health literacy is independently and significantly related to parent depression, child television viewing, and at-risk family behaviors associated with child injury. Use of low-literacy approaches to health-behavior interventions may be essential to address common child morbidities.

AB - BACKGROUND: Population-wide research on the impact of parent health literacy to children's health outcomes is limited. We assessed the relationship of low parent health literacy to a range of pediatric health risks within a large cohort of primary care patients. METHODS: Data were from 17 845 English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children aged =7 years presenting for well-child care. We used a 3-item screener to measure health literacy. Outcomes included secondhand smoke exposure, asthma treatment nonadherence, parent depression, child-rearing practices, injury prevention, and parent first-aid knowledge. We summarized study variables with descriptive statistics and then performed multivariable logistic regression to identify associations between low parent literacy and our dependent measures. RESULTS: Mean child age was 4.8 years (SD 3.7); 36.5% of parent respondents had low health literacy. In models adjusted for child gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, age, and parent language preference, low parent health literacy was related to a range of pediatric health risks, including parent depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.48), firearm access (AOR 1.68; 1.49-1.89), not having a working smoke detector (AOR 3.54; 2.74-4.58), and lack of first-aid knowledge about choking (AOR 1.67; 1.44-1.93) and burns (AOR 1.45; 1.29-1.63). Children of parents with low health literacy were also more likely to watch >2 hours of television per day (AOR 1.27; 1.17-1.36). CONCLUSIONS: Low parent health literacy is independently and significantly related to parent depression, child television viewing, and at-risk family behaviors associated with child injury. Use of low-literacy approaches to health-behavior interventions may be essential to address common child morbidities.

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