Parental stress management using relaxation techniques in a neonatal intensive care unit: A randomised controlled trial

Catherine Fotiou, Petros V. Vlastarakos, Chrysa Bakoula, Konstantinos Papagaroufalis, Giorgos Bakoyannis, Christine Darviri, George Chrousos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxation techniques on the stress/anxiety of parents with hospitalised premature infants, three months following discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. Study design: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary maternity hospital including 59 parents, who were randomised into two groups: 31 in the intervention group and 28 in the control group. Parents in the intervention group practiced three different relaxation techniques, in addition to undergoing the same information-based training courses as did the parents of the control group. Data collection: Data were collected 10-15 days post delivery and three months post discharge. The assessment measures included the Perceived Stress Scale, the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory 1 and 2 and salivary cortisol levels. Results: The psychometric assessment at baseline was comparable between the two groups. The intervention group showed a significant reduction in trait anxiety (p = 0.02) compared with the control group three months post discharge. The perceived stress decreased in both groups (p = 0.699). No difference in salivary cortisol levels was detected. The multivariate analysis revealed that higher initial stress levels (p < 0.001) and university/college education (p = 0.003) were associated with higher parental stress, whereas moderate-to-high income satisfaction was associated with lower parental stress (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Further long-term follow-up of families with a neonatal intensive care unit experience could assess more delayed effects of stress management by relaxation techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-28
Number of pages9
JournalIntensive and Critical Care Nursing
Volume32
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Relaxation Therapy
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Randomized Controlled Trials
Parents
Anxiety
Control Groups
Hydrocortisone
Maternity Hospitals
Psychometrics
Tertiary Care Centers
Premature Infants
Multivariate Analysis
Education
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Infant
  • Neonate
  • NICU
  • Parent
  • Prematurity
  • Relaxation techniques
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care

Cite this

Parental stress management using relaxation techniques in a neonatal intensive care unit : A randomised controlled trial. / Fotiou, Catherine; Vlastarakos, Petros V.; Bakoula, Chrysa; Papagaroufalis, Konstantinos; Bakoyannis, Giorgos; Darviri, Christine; Chrousos, George.

In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Vol. 32, 01.02.2016, p. 20-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fotiou, Catherine ; Vlastarakos, Petros V. ; Bakoula, Chrysa ; Papagaroufalis, Konstantinos ; Bakoyannis, Giorgos ; Darviri, Christine ; Chrousos, George. / Parental stress management using relaxation techniques in a neonatal intensive care unit : A randomised controlled trial. In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. 2016 ; Vol. 32. pp. 20-28.
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