Partial recovery of gustatory function after neurol tissue transplantation to the lesioned gustatory neocortex

Raz Yirmiya, Feng Zhou, Mark D. Holder, Daniel A. Deems, John Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of homotypic cortical tissue grafts to induce recovery of function after a gustatory neocortex (GN) lesion was studied using the conditioned taste aversion (CTA) paradigm. On acquisition day, 26 GN-lesioned and 8 sham-lesioned rats were presented with a saccharin solution, followed by an injection of the illness-inducing agent lithium chloride (LiCl). On the test day, 2 days later, saccharin was presented again. The GN-lesioned rats showed significantly less aversion to saccharin on the test day, indicating that the lesion impaired their ability to form taste-illness association. Nine of the lesioned rats were then bilaterally transplanted with fetal GN tissue. Nine weeks after the transplantation, the rats were presented with a LiCl solution, which served as both a tastant and an illness-inducing agent. An NaCl solution, which tasted very similar to the LiCl solution, was used to test the CTA to salt 3 days later. The nontransplanted rats consumed significantly more LiCl than the transplanted and sham-operated rats on the acquisition day, but both transplanted and nontransplanted rats consumed more NaCl than sham-operated rats on the test day. Nissl and Golgi stainings showed numerous somata and extensive arborization of neurons within the grafts. The results indicate that fetal GN grafts can restore the ability to integrate gustatory and visceral inputs but not to form long-lasting taste-illness associations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-625
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988

Fingerprint

Tissue Transplantation
Neocortex
Recovery of Function
Lithium Chloride
Saccharin
Aptitude
Transplants
Carisoprodol
Salts
Transplantation
Staining and Labeling
Neurons

Keywords

  • Conditioned taste aversion
  • Golgi staining
  • Gustatory neocortex
  • Neurol tissue transplantation
  • Sensory integration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Partial recovery of gustatory function after neurol tissue transplantation to the lesioned gustatory neocortex. / Yirmiya, Raz; Zhou, Feng; Holder, Mark D.; Deems, Daniel A.; Garcia, John.

In: Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 20, No. 5, 1988, p. 619-625.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yirmiya, Raz ; Zhou, Feng ; Holder, Mark D. ; Deems, Daniel A. ; Garcia, John. / Partial recovery of gustatory function after neurol tissue transplantation to the lesioned gustatory neocortex. In: Brain Research Bulletin. 1988 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 619-625.
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