Partial volume correction in quantitative amyloid imaging

Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-64
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroImage
Volume107
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 5 2015

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Keywords

  • Amyloid imaging
  • Partial volume correction
  • PET
  • PiB

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

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