Particulate matter, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity.

Sheba M.J. MohanKumar, Arezoo Campbell, Michelle Block, Bellina Veronesi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Particulate matter (PM), a component of air pollution has been epidemiologically associated with sudden deaths, cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses. The effects are more pronounced in patients with pre-existing conditions such as asthma, diabetes or obstructive pulmonary disorders. Clinical and experimental studies have historically focused on the cardiopulmonary effects of PM. However, since PM particles carry numerous biocontaminants that are capable of triggering free radical production and cytokine release, the possibility that PM may affect organs systems sensitive to oxidative stress must be considered. Four independent studies that summarize the neurochemical and neuropathological changes found in the brains of PM exposed animals are described here. These were recently presented at two 2007 symposia sponsored by the Society of Toxicology (Charlotte, NC) and the International Neurotoxicology Association (Monterey, CA).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-488
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroToxicology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Oxidative stress
Particulate Matter
Oxidative Stress
Preexisting Condition Coverage
Air Pollution
Medical problems
Sudden Death
Air pollution
Free Radicals
Brain
Animals
Asthma
Cytokines
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Particulate matter, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. / MohanKumar, Sheba M.J.; Campbell, Arezoo; Block, Michelle; Veronesi, Bellina.

In: NeuroToxicology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 05.2008, p. 479-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

MohanKumar, SMJ, Campbell, A, Block, M & Veronesi, B 2008, 'Particulate matter, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity.', NeuroToxicology, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 479-488. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2007.12.004
MohanKumar, Sheba M.J. ; Campbell, Arezoo ; Block, Michelle ; Veronesi, Bellina. / Particulate matter, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. In: NeuroToxicology. 2008 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 479-488.
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