Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease

Michelle L. Johnson, Lani Zimmerman, Janet Welch, Melody Hertzog, Bunny Pozehl, Troy Plumb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SUMMARY: Background: Chronic kidney disease is a growing health problem on a global scale. The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease presents an urgent need to better understand the knowledge, confidence and engagement in self-managing the disease. Objectives: This study examined group differences in patient activation and health-related quality of life, knowledge, self-management and confidence with managing chronic disease across all five stages of chronic kidney disease. Design: The study employed a descriptive correlational design. Settings: Participants were recruited from five primary care, three nephrology clinics and one dialysis centre in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Participants: The convenience sample included 85 adults with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease, including kidney failure, who spoke English. Measurements: Seven measurements were used to collect data via telephone interviews with participants not receiving haemodialysis, and face-to-face interviews with those receiving haemodialysis at the beginning of their treatment session. Results: Analyses indicated that half the participants were female (50.58%), the mean age was 63.21 years (SD=13.11), and participants with chronic kidney disease stage 3 were the most activated. Post hoc differences were significant in patient activation and blood pressure self-management and anxiety across chronic kidney disease stages, excluding stage 5. Conclusion: Engaging patients in the self-management of their health care and enhancing patients' ability to self-manage their blood pressure may work to preserve kidney health. Healthcare providers should collaborate with patients to develop strategies that will maintain patients' health-related quality of life, like reducing anxiety as kidney disease progress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-22
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Renal Care
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Knowledge Management
Patient Participation
Self Care
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Renal Dialysis
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Interviews
Blood Pressure
Aptitude
Nephrology
Health
Kidney Diseases
Health Personnel
Renal Insufficiency
Dialysis
Primary Health Care
Diabetes Mellitus
Chronic Disease
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Patient activation
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Johnson, M. L., Zimmerman, L., Welch, J., Hertzog, M., Pozehl, B., & Plumb, T. (2016). Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease. Journal of Renal Care, 42(1), 15-22. https://doi.org/10.1111/jorc.12142

Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease. / Johnson, Michelle L.; Zimmerman, Lani; Welch, Janet; Hertzog, Melody; Pozehl, Bunny; Plumb, Troy.

In: Journal of Renal Care, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 15-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, ML, Zimmerman, L, Welch, J, Hertzog, M, Pozehl, B & Plumb, T 2016, 'Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease', Journal of Renal Care, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 15-22. https://doi.org/10.1111/jorc.12142
Johnson, Michelle L. ; Zimmerman, Lani ; Welch, Janet ; Hertzog, Melody ; Pozehl, Bunny ; Plumb, Troy. / Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease. In: Journal of Renal Care. 2016 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 15-22.
@article{bf3c159ac4114368addebdd1a0984e62,
title = "Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease",
abstract = "SUMMARY: Background: Chronic kidney disease is a growing health problem on a global scale. The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease presents an urgent need to better understand the knowledge, confidence and engagement in self-managing the disease. Objectives: This study examined group differences in patient activation and health-related quality of life, knowledge, self-management and confidence with managing chronic disease across all five stages of chronic kidney disease. Design: The study employed a descriptive correlational design. Settings: Participants were recruited from five primary care, three nephrology clinics and one dialysis centre in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Participants: The convenience sample included 85 adults with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease, including kidney failure, who spoke English. Measurements: Seven measurements were used to collect data via telephone interviews with participants not receiving haemodialysis, and face-to-face interviews with those receiving haemodialysis at the beginning of their treatment session. Results: Analyses indicated that half the participants were female (50.58{\%}), the mean age was 63.21 years (SD=13.11), and participants with chronic kidney disease stage 3 were the most activated. Post hoc differences were significant in patient activation and blood pressure self-management and anxiety across chronic kidney disease stages, excluding stage 5. Conclusion: Engaging patients in the self-management of their health care and enhancing patients' ability to self-manage their blood pressure may work to preserve kidney health. Healthcare providers should collaborate with patients to develop strategies that will maintain patients' health-related quality of life, like reducing anxiety as kidney disease progress.",
keywords = "Chronic kidney disease, Health-related quality of life, Patient activation, Self-management",
author = "Johnson, {Michelle L.} and Lani Zimmerman and Janet Welch and Melody Hertzog and Bunny Pozehl and Troy Plumb",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jorc.12142",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "15--22",
journal = "Journal of Renal Care",
issn = "1755-6678",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease

AU - Johnson, Michelle L.

AU - Zimmerman, Lani

AU - Welch, Janet

AU - Hertzog, Melody

AU - Pozehl, Bunny

AU - Plumb, Troy

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - SUMMARY: Background: Chronic kidney disease is a growing health problem on a global scale. The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease presents an urgent need to better understand the knowledge, confidence and engagement in self-managing the disease. Objectives: This study examined group differences in patient activation and health-related quality of life, knowledge, self-management and confidence with managing chronic disease across all five stages of chronic kidney disease. Design: The study employed a descriptive correlational design. Settings: Participants were recruited from five primary care, three nephrology clinics and one dialysis centre in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Participants: The convenience sample included 85 adults with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease, including kidney failure, who spoke English. Measurements: Seven measurements were used to collect data via telephone interviews with participants not receiving haemodialysis, and face-to-face interviews with those receiving haemodialysis at the beginning of their treatment session. Results: Analyses indicated that half the participants were female (50.58%), the mean age was 63.21 years (SD=13.11), and participants with chronic kidney disease stage 3 were the most activated. Post hoc differences were significant in patient activation and blood pressure self-management and anxiety across chronic kidney disease stages, excluding stage 5. Conclusion: Engaging patients in the self-management of their health care and enhancing patients' ability to self-manage their blood pressure may work to preserve kidney health. Healthcare providers should collaborate with patients to develop strategies that will maintain patients' health-related quality of life, like reducing anxiety as kidney disease progress.

AB - SUMMARY: Background: Chronic kidney disease is a growing health problem on a global scale. The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease presents an urgent need to better understand the knowledge, confidence and engagement in self-managing the disease. Objectives: This study examined group differences in patient activation and health-related quality of life, knowledge, self-management and confidence with managing chronic disease across all five stages of chronic kidney disease. Design: The study employed a descriptive correlational design. Settings: Participants were recruited from five primary care, three nephrology clinics and one dialysis centre in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Participants: The convenience sample included 85 adults with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease, including kidney failure, who spoke English. Measurements: Seven measurements were used to collect data via telephone interviews with participants not receiving haemodialysis, and face-to-face interviews with those receiving haemodialysis at the beginning of their treatment session. Results: Analyses indicated that half the participants were female (50.58%), the mean age was 63.21 years (SD=13.11), and participants with chronic kidney disease stage 3 were the most activated. Post hoc differences were significant in patient activation and blood pressure self-management and anxiety across chronic kidney disease stages, excluding stage 5. Conclusion: Engaging patients in the self-management of their health care and enhancing patients' ability to self-manage their blood pressure may work to preserve kidney health. Healthcare providers should collaborate with patients to develop strategies that will maintain patients' health-related quality of life, like reducing anxiety as kidney disease progress.

KW - Chronic kidney disease

KW - Health-related quality of life

KW - Patient activation

KW - Self-management

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84957947672&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84957947672&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jorc.12142

DO - 10.1111/jorc.12142

M3 - Article

C2 - 26537188

AN - SCOPUS:84957947672

VL - 42

SP - 15

EP - 22

JO - Journal of Renal Care

JF - Journal of Renal Care

SN - 1755-6678

IS - 1

ER -