Patient Perceptions of Provider and Hospital Factors Associated With New Medication Communication

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research examined provider and hospital factors associated with patients’ perceptions of how often explanations of new medications were “always” given to them, using Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores. HCAHPS results were obtained for October 2012 to September 2013, from 3,420 hospitals and combined with a Magnet-designated hospital listing. Multiple regression examined correlates of new medication communication, including health care provider factors (perceptions of nurse and physician communication) and health care system factors (magnet designation, hospital ownership, hospital type, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers). Nurse and physician communication was strongly associated with new medication communication (r =.819, p <.001; r =.722, p <.001, respectively). Multivariable correlates included nurse communication (p <.001), physician communication (p <.001), hospital ownership, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers. There was a significant relationship between patients’ perceptions of nurse and physician communication and the explanations they had received about their new medications during hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1139-1154
Number of pages16
JournalWestern Journal of Nursing Research
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Communication
Nurses
Health Personnel
Physicians
Magnets
Ownership
Delivery of Health Care
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Emergencies
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • acute care
  • descriptive quantitative
  • health care provider communication
  • location of care
  • medication
  • methods
  • nursing communication
  • patient perceptions
  • physician communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "This research examined provider and hospital factors associated with patients’ perceptions of how often explanations of new medications were “always” given to them, using Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores. HCAHPS results were obtained for October 2012 to September 2013, from 3,420 hospitals and combined with a Magnet-designated hospital listing. Multiple regression examined correlates of new medication communication, including health care provider factors (perceptions of nurse and physician communication) and health care system factors (magnet designation, hospital ownership, hospital type, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers). Nurse and physician communication was strongly associated with new medication communication (r =.819, p <.001; r =.722, p <.001, respectively). Multivariable correlates included nurse communication (p <.001), physician communication (p <.001), hospital ownership, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers. There was a significant relationship between patients’ perceptions of nurse and physician communication and the explanations they had received about their new medications during hospitalization.",
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