Patients' health literacy and experience with instructions: Influence preferences for heart failure medication instructions

Daniel G. Morrow, Michael Weiner, Douglas Steinley, James Young, Michael Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We developed a pharmacist-based patient education intervention to improve older adults' adherence to chronic heart failure (CHF) medications, which included written patient-centered instructions. The study evaluated these instructions by examining whether patients preferred them to standard pharmacy instructions. Method: Elders diagnosed with CHF participated in the randomized controlled trial (83 in the intervention; 153 in usual care control group). Instruction preferences were collected after 6 months of participation. Results: Patient-centered instructions were preferred for learning about adherence information (e.g., schedule) and standard instructions for learning about drug interactions. Preference for the patient-centered instructions was greater for intervention versus control participants and for participants with lower health literacy. Literacy no longer predicted preferences with patients' cognitive abilities controlled, suggesting literacy reflected more fundamental cognitive mechanisms. Discussion: The finding that preferences varied with patients' experience using the instructions and cognitive abilities suggests instructions should accommodate diverse patient needs and abilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)575-593
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
medication
Heart Failure
literacy
Aptitude
instruction
health
Patient Preference
experience
Learning
cognitive ability
Patient Education
Drug Interactions
Pharmacists
Appointments and Schedules
Randomized Controlled Trials
Control Groups
pharmacist
learning
drug

Keywords

  • Chronic heart failure
  • Health communication
  • Health literacy
  • Medication instructions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Aging
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Patients' health literacy and experience with instructions : Influence preferences for heart failure medication instructions. / Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Steinley, Douglas; Young, James; Murray, Michael.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 19, No. 4, 08.2007, p. 575-593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7ad1d95207c848a0ae26be8432318809,
title = "Patients' health literacy and experience with instructions: Influence preferences for heart failure medication instructions",
abstract = "Objective: We developed a pharmacist-based patient education intervention to improve older adults' adherence to chronic heart failure (CHF) medications, which included written patient-centered instructions. The study evaluated these instructions by examining whether patients preferred them to standard pharmacy instructions. Method: Elders diagnosed with CHF participated in the randomized controlled trial (83 in the intervention; 153 in usual care control group). Instruction preferences were collected after 6 months of participation. Results: Patient-centered instructions were preferred for learning about adherence information (e.g., schedule) and standard instructions for learning about drug interactions. Preference for the patient-centered instructions was greater for intervention versus control participants and for participants with lower health literacy. Literacy no longer predicted preferences with patients' cognitive abilities controlled, suggesting literacy reflected more fundamental cognitive mechanisms. Discussion: The finding that preferences varied with patients' experience using the instructions and cognitive abilities suggests instructions should accommodate diverse patient needs and abilities.",
keywords = "Chronic heart failure, Health communication, Health literacy, Medication instructions",
author = "Morrow, {Daniel G.} and Michael Weiner and Douglas Steinley and James Young and Michael Murray",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1177/0898264307304448",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "575--593",
journal = "Journal of Aging and Health",
issn = "0898-2643",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patients' health literacy and experience with instructions

T2 - Influence preferences for heart failure medication instructions

AU - Morrow, Daniel G.

AU - Weiner, Michael

AU - Steinley, Douglas

AU - Young, James

AU - Murray, Michael

PY - 2007/8

Y1 - 2007/8

N2 - Objective: We developed a pharmacist-based patient education intervention to improve older adults' adherence to chronic heart failure (CHF) medications, which included written patient-centered instructions. The study evaluated these instructions by examining whether patients preferred them to standard pharmacy instructions. Method: Elders diagnosed with CHF participated in the randomized controlled trial (83 in the intervention; 153 in usual care control group). Instruction preferences were collected after 6 months of participation. Results: Patient-centered instructions were preferred for learning about adherence information (e.g., schedule) and standard instructions for learning about drug interactions. Preference for the patient-centered instructions was greater for intervention versus control participants and for participants with lower health literacy. Literacy no longer predicted preferences with patients' cognitive abilities controlled, suggesting literacy reflected more fundamental cognitive mechanisms. Discussion: The finding that preferences varied with patients' experience using the instructions and cognitive abilities suggests instructions should accommodate diverse patient needs and abilities.

AB - Objective: We developed a pharmacist-based patient education intervention to improve older adults' adherence to chronic heart failure (CHF) medications, which included written patient-centered instructions. The study evaluated these instructions by examining whether patients preferred them to standard pharmacy instructions. Method: Elders diagnosed with CHF participated in the randomized controlled trial (83 in the intervention; 153 in usual care control group). Instruction preferences were collected after 6 months of participation. Results: Patient-centered instructions were preferred for learning about adherence information (e.g., schedule) and standard instructions for learning about drug interactions. Preference for the patient-centered instructions was greater for intervention versus control participants and for participants with lower health literacy. Literacy no longer predicted preferences with patients' cognitive abilities controlled, suggesting literacy reflected more fundamental cognitive mechanisms. Discussion: The finding that preferences varied with patients' experience using the instructions and cognitive abilities suggests instructions should accommodate diverse patient needs and abilities.

KW - Chronic heart failure

KW - Health communication

KW - Health literacy

KW - Medication instructions

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34447334167&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34447334167&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0898264307304448

DO - 10.1177/0898264307304448

M3 - Article

C2 - 17682075

AN - SCOPUS:34447334167

VL - 19

SP - 575

EP - 593

JO - Journal of Aging and Health

JF - Journal of Aging and Health

SN - 0898-2643

IS - 4

ER -