Patterns of organ-specific engraftment by stem cell subsets and committed progenitors

W. E. Nibley, S. J. Pohlmann, G. J. Spangrude, E. D. Zanjani, Hal Broxmeyer, S. J. Sharkis, B. Torok-Storb, J. W. Adamson, W. E. Fibbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The kinetics of blood and organ engraftment following transplants of defined populations of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were investigated utilizing cell populations defined by surface antigen and rhodamine-123 staining. While long-term repopulating stem cells, short-term multipotent progenitors and committed progenitors all reconstituted peripheral blood red cells and splenic cellularity, only the population of cells that includes highly enriched long-term repopulating stem cells (Thy-1.1(low)Lin(neg)Sca- 1+Rh123(low)) reconstituted marrow cellularity. In addition, peripheral blood platelet and nucleated cell count increased only after transplant of the long-term repopulating population. These results argue that the major cell population that functions to reconstitute hematopoiesis after bone marrow transplantation is a primitive, marrow-homing stem cell. Transplantation of highly enriched multipotent progenitors that lack long- term reconstituting potential had no impact on hematopoietic recovery, apart from a transient increase in circulating erythrocytes. These results suggest that the primary cell population that functions to reconstitute hematopoiesis in a transplant setting is the long-term repopulating stem cell. This observation is discussed in the context of the normal hematopoietic process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-39
Number of pages9
JournalStem Cells
Volume15
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stem Cells
Population
Hematopoiesis
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Transplants
Erythrocytes
Bone Marrow
Rhodamine 123
Surface Antigens
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Blood Platelets
Cell Count
Transplantation
Staining and Labeling

Keywords

  • Bone marrow transplantation
  • Engraftment kinetics
  • Hematopoiesis
  • Progenitor cells
  • Stem cell biology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Nibley, W. E., Pohlmann, S. J., Spangrude, G. J., Zanjani, E. D., Broxmeyer, H., Sharkis, S. J., ... Fibbe, W. E. (1997). Patterns of organ-specific engraftment by stem cell subsets and committed progenitors. Stem Cells, 15(SUPPL. 1), 31-39.

Patterns of organ-specific engraftment by stem cell subsets and committed progenitors. / Nibley, W. E.; Pohlmann, S. J.; Spangrude, G. J.; Zanjani, E. D.; Broxmeyer, Hal; Sharkis, S. J.; Torok-Storb, B.; Adamson, J. W.; Fibbe, W. E.

In: Stem Cells, Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 1, 1997, p. 31-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nibley, WE, Pohlmann, SJ, Spangrude, GJ, Zanjani, ED, Broxmeyer, H, Sharkis, SJ, Torok-Storb, B, Adamson, JW & Fibbe, WE 1997, 'Patterns of organ-specific engraftment by stem cell subsets and committed progenitors', Stem Cells, vol. 15, no. SUPPL. 1, pp. 31-39.
Nibley WE, Pohlmann SJ, Spangrude GJ, Zanjani ED, Broxmeyer H, Sharkis SJ et al. Patterns of organ-specific engraftment by stem cell subsets and committed progenitors. Stem Cells. 1997;15(SUPPL. 1):31-39.
Nibley, W. E. ; Pohlmann, S. J. ; Spangrude, G. J. ; Zanjani, E. D. ; Broxmeyer, Hal ; Sharkis, S. J. ; Torok-Storb, B. ; Adamson, J. W. ; Fibbe, W. E. / Patterns of organ-specific engraftment by stem cell subsets and committed progenitors. In: Stem Cells. 1997 ; Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 31-39.
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