Pediatric cardiac tumors: a 45-year, single-institution review

Laura Linnemeier, Brian D. Benneyworth, Mark Turrentine, Mark Rodefeld, John Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cardiac tumors in children are rare. Of the cases reported in the literature, nearly all are benign and managed conservatively.

METHODS: This is a retrospective, observational study of pediatric patients

RESULTS: Over the last 45 years, 64 patients were evaluated for surgical resection of a cardiac tumor. Rhabdomyoma was the most common neoplasm (58%), and 17% of the tumors had malignant pathologies. While 42% of benign cardiac neoplasms required surgical intervention for significant hemodynamic concerns, 73% of malignant neoplasms underwent radical excision, if possible, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite a 37% mortality in patients with malignant pathology, an aggressive surgical approach can yield long-term survival in some patients. There were no deaths among patients with benign tumors and 17% had postoperative complications mostly related to mitral regurgitation.

CONCLUSION: Cardiac tumors in children are rare but can be managed aggressively with good outcomes. Benign tumors have an excellent survival with most complications related to tumor location. Malignant tumors have a high mortality rate, but surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy allow for prolonged survival in selected patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-219
Number of pages5
JournalWorld Journal for Pediatric and Congenital Hearth Surgery
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Heart Neoplasms
Pediatrics
Neoplasms
Adjuvant Chemotherapy
Survival
Rhabdomyoma
Surgical Pathology
Mortality
Mitral Valve Insufficiency
Observational Studies
Retrospective Studies
Hemodynamics
Pathology

Keywords

  • cardiac tumors
  • congenital heart disease
  • congenital heart surgery
  • outcomes
  • pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pediatric cardiac tumors : a 45-year, single-institution review. / Linnemeier, Laura; Benneyworth, Brian D.; Turrentine, Mark; Rodefeld, Mark; Brown, John.

In: World Journal for Pediatric and Congenital Hearth Surgery, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 215-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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