Pediatric neurosurgery.

Cormac O. Maher, Aaron Cohen-Gadol, Corey Raffel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Randomized controlled trials of neurosurgical procedures involving children have been organized infrequently; as a consequence, the majority of pediatric neurosurgical practice is not supported by class I data. Furthermore, many trials that have been reported suffer from serious methodological shortcomings such as insufficient power and poor statistical analysis. Finally, several trials of neurosurgical techniques that are frequently performed on children have either excluded children from participation or include an insufficient number of children to draw strong conclusions. Despite these shortcomings, pediatric neurosurgery, like all fields in medicine, is gradually moving towards a more stringent evidence-based medicine standard. This chapter will attempt to summarize the recent progress that has been made in this area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-106
Number of pages10
JournalProgress in neurological surgery
Volume19
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Neurosurgery
Pediatrics
Neurosurgical Procedures
Evidence-Based Medicine
Randomized Controlled Trials
Medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Maher, C. O., Cohen-Gadol, A., & Raffel, C. (2006). Pediatric neurosurgery. Progress in neurological surgery, 19, 97-106.

Pediatric neurosurgery. / Maher, Cormac O.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron; Raffel, Corey.

In: Progress in neurological surgery, Vol. 19, 2006, p. 97-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maher, CO, Cohen-Gadol, A & Raffel, C 2006, 'Pediatric neurosurgery.', Progress in neurological surgery, vol. 19, pp. 97-106.
Maher, Cormac O. ; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron ; Raffel, Corey. / Pediatric neurosurgery. In: Progress in neurological surgery. 2006 ; Vol. 19. pp. 97-106.
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