Pediatric penile pain secondary to idiopathic arterial thrombosis

Deepak Agarwal, Boaz Karmazyn, Donald Corea, Martin Kaefer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Penile pain in the pediatric population can result from a variety of causes. Although urinary tract infection, urethral stricture and trauma are well-recognized etiologies, they are typically not identified. Most discomfort is therefore attributed to referred pain secondary to dysfunctional voiding behavior. Supporting this frequent conclusion is the often concomitant complaint by the family and patient of intermittent penile tumescence - itself typically the result of bladder over-distension. We present the first pediatric case of penile pain with intermittent penile tumescence secondary to arterial thrombosis and emphasize the critical need for a high index of suspicion in order to identify this unusual condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-320
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports
Volume1
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Penile Erection
Thrombosis
Referred Pain
Pediatrics
Pain
Urethral Stricture
Urinary Tract Infections
Urinary Bladder
Wounds and Injuries
Population

Keywords

  • Pediatric
  • Penile pain
  • Thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

Cite this

Pediatric penile pain secondary to idiopathic arterial thrombosis. / Agarwal, Deepak; Karmazyn, Boaz; Corea, Donald; Kaefer, Martin.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, Vol. 1, No. 9, 09.2013, p. 319-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agarwal, Deepak ; Karmazyn, Boaz ; Corea, Donald ; Kaefer, Martin. / Pediatric penile pain secondary to idiopathic arterial thrombosis. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports. 2013 ; Vol. 1, No. 9. pp. 319-320.
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